Courses In Art & Art History

ART 110. Creative Practice. This course immerses students in the process of making contemporary art, from concept to presentation. Students learn, through the practice of visual thinking, how to develop ideas and experiments with materials to create effective works of art. Creative Practice also incorporates the analysis and interpretation of art, and exposure to the global art world, through readings, gallery visits, documentary films, and writing assignments.  Note: Cannot take course if taken or in-progress of ART-103. 4 credits.

ART 200. Ceramics Studio. This course provides an intensive exploration of the ceramics medium through specific topics that vary from year to year. Topics may be thematic or focus on a particular technical aspect of the medium, providing students with unique opportunities to engage in a variety of methods and concepts. Each offering will bear a specific subtitle indicating the content to be presented.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. This course has a $100.00 studio fee. 4 credits.

ART 205. Drawing Studio. This course provides an intensive exploration of the drawing medium through specific topics that vary from year to year. Topics may be thematic or focus on a particular technical aspect of the medium, providing students with unique opportunities to engage in a variety of methods and concepts. Each offering will bear a specific subtitle indicating the content to be presented.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. This course has a $50.00 studio fee. 4 credits.

ART 210. Painting Studio. This course provides an intensive exploration of the painting medium through specific topics that vary from year to year. Topics may be thematic or focus on a particular technical aspect of the medium, providing students with unique opportunities to engage in a variety of methods and concepts. Each offering will bear a specific subtitle indicating the content to be presented.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. This course has a $100.00 studio fee. 4 credits.

ART 215. Photo Studio. This course provides an intensive exploration of the photography medium through specific topics that vary from year to year. Topics may be thematic or focus on a particular technical aspect of the medium, providing students with unique opportunities to engage in a variety of methods and concepts. Each offering will bear a specific subtitle indicating the content to be presented.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. This course has a $50.00 studio fee. 4 credits.

ART 220. Print Studio. This course provides an intensive exploration of the printmaking medium through specific topics that vary from year to year. Topics may be thematic or focus on a particular technical aspect of the medium, providing students with unique opportunities to engage in a variety of methods and concepts. Each offering will bear a specific subtitle indicating the content to be presented.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. This course has a $100.00 studio fee. 4 credits.

ART 225. Sculpture Studio. This course provides an intensive exploration of the sculpture medium through specific topics that vary from year to year. Topics may be thematic or focus on a particular technical aspect of the medium, providing students with unique opportunities to engage in a variety of methods and concepts. Each offering will bear a specific subtitle indicating the content to be presented.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. This course has a $100.00 studio fee. 4 credits.

ART 230. Art Media Production. This course introduces media and design skills for students seeking career paths in the art and culture industries. Emphasizing computer applications needed for portfolio building and professional work in galleries and museums, the course provides students with training and development guidance for employment and graduate opportunities. Students will also acquire a more pronounced understanding of the global art world and its impact on culture and the economy.  4 credits.

ART 250. World Architecture. From the great monuments of the world to the most humble domestic dwellings, architecture shapes cultural values and national identities. Beyond the pragmatic needs for shelter and defense, architectural structures communicate a variety of human needs ranging from a desire to memorialize to a will to propagandize. By studying architectural form across time, we gain an insight into cultural differences and universalities that underline all built environments. Students will investigate the stylistic evolution, the structural solutions, and the spatial strategies that architects have employed to shape our experience of the world.  Fulfills general education requirement: Intercultural Diversity. 4 credits.

ART 260. The Photograph. This course explores the role of photography as an art form, as a tool for communication and storytelling, and as a medium of realism that is increasingly called upon for verification within the society. In providing a history of the photograph from its origins in the early nineteenth century to the digital age, the course grapples with the compelling nature of the photograph as a carrier of potent meaning. Students will examine the use of photography for portraiture, landscape and architecture, social documentary, and scientific research while gaining an understanding of the stylistic shifts in the medium in relation to cultural aesthetics.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). 3 credits.

ART 350. Topics in Art History and Visual Culture. The course focuses on the issues surrounding one central theme or topic in the study of art history or visual culture. The course will examine art and material culture in a historical, intellectual, and cultural context and develop the competencies of inquiry, analysis, and critical thinking through written and oral communication. Based on previous courses taught, topics will include Renaissance Art, Baroque Art, Art and Revolution, Art and Technology, Art and the Environment, and Art and Aesthetics.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. 3 credits.

ART 355. Abstraction. One of the great achievements of the modern age is the development of abstract forms of art. Artists began to move beyond merely representing the natural world to seek new non-objective realities. Relinquishing all traces of the discernible subject had a seismic effect on art. For the first time, visual art now had an aesthetic and language all its own. This course examines the evolution of abstract art as various modernist artists, liberated from the world of objects sought to dismantle the preceding pictorial regimes and ways of knowing. Through historical, philosophical, and practical study, students will explore the experimental and theoretical nature that underpins all abstract art.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). 4 credits.

ART 360. Contemporary Art. This course explores the cultural and theoretical underpinnings of the contemporary art world. Students will examine those key elements that define art today, such as the art market, the media and art critics, the cultural controversies, and the rising context of the global. By tracing the diverse narratives that inform the art world the student will understand how contemporary art generates meaning, and what methods and theories are employed to critique and interpret these emerging forms. Students will also explore, through an architectural design project, the latest exhibition trends in contemporary art.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). 4 credits.

ART 365. The Cinematic. The course examines film - as a technological medium and an art form - in relation to existing forms of visual art including drawing, painting, and photography. By investigating the kinesthetic origins of cinema, students explore how the history of representation has fixated on concepts of motion, spectatorship, and storytelling. These characteristics converge in the art and film of the early 1900's, culminating in the classic art cinema of Hollywood and other national film industries. In recent decades artists and filmmakers have sought to deconstruct the attributes of art and film through experimental works that transcend media and influence mainstream cinema.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). Note: Cannot take course if taken or in-progress of ART 332. 4 credits.

ART 370. Museology. Do you have a deep and enduring interest in museums? Are you curious about how a museum operates? This course is intended for students interested in all types of museums including art, history, science, and social issues. By introducing students to the origins of museums and exploring the role museums have played in shaping history and knowledge, students will gain exposure to museology from a global perspective. Topics include the evolution of museum collections, methods of display, and the changing role of museums in reaching a broad spectrum of society. Museology also provides essential professional skills for students pursuing career or graduate opportunities in the museums or related fields including education, design, marketing, outreach, archiving, and conservation.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. 3 credits.

ART 375. Curatorial Projects. Exhibition-making is an important practice because it allows us to display, examine, and theorize cultural objects within a gallery or museum environment. This course aims to familiarize students with the multifaceted tasks of curation. Students will experience both in the curatorial duties of working with acquisitions, collection management, and conservation, as well as the creative aspects of exhibition ideation. Students will articulate a rationale for an exhibition, identify objects appropriate to the exhibit's mission, secure loans, and plan spatial layouts for installation. The students will also become practiced in writing catalogs and wall text, and managing publications and marketing.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Fulfills general education requirement: 4 credits.

ART 380. Color Plus Culture. How does color shape our understanding of the world? This is the center question of Color Plus Culture, a course in which we will investigate the powerful role that color has played throughout human history. With the history of art as a starting point, students will analyze the origins, uses, and interpretations of color from the earliest human cultures to the present, emphasizing the criteria by which color has been valued. These criteria incorporate a wide range of factors - aesthetic, biological, economic, religious and social - that have impacted culture in myriad ways and continue to influence our attitudes toward color.  Fulfills general education requirement: Disciplinary Perspectives. 4 credits.

ART 400. Internship. Internship in Art and Visual Culture.  Graded¬†pass/fail. This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Fulfills general education requirement: 1-12 credits.

ART 405. Advanced Studio. For students who have completed foundation and intermediate-level courses in studio art and are ready to work independently while receiving faculty guidance and feedback. Working in a medium of one's choice (for example, ceramics or painting or photography), students create and present a resolved body of work.  The course can be repeated so that students can undertake different creative projects or work continuously on a sustained project, either one of which is essential for future work as an artist or art educator. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing or by permission; limited to Art and Visual Culture majors and minors. 3 credits.

ART 440. Directed Practice. This course provides the opportunity for students to develop and present a focused studio art project that builds upon established skills and concepts. Students work independently while receiving faculty guidance and evaluation on all aspects of the creative process, including the integration of research and the articulation of themes in written form. Majors and minors are required to take at least one semester of Directed Practice, but students whose Professional Focus is in the Studio Arts are encouraged to undertake two or more semesters of independent work.  This course has a $100.00 studio fee. Fulfills general education requirement: Prerequisite: Limited to art and art history, or art and visual culture majors and minors only. Complete at least two previous studio art courses, or by permission of the instructor. 4 credits.

ART 460. Directed Research. This course allows students to develop a self-designed, semester-long intensive written research project. Through close faculty mentoring, students will learn current research practices and apply the various analytical tools available to art historians, art critics, and art theorists. The research project will result in a fully edited essay, a poster presentation, and an oral presentation, and each student is expected to showcase their project at appropriate undergraduate research symposia or conferences.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Fulfills general education requirement: Prerequisites: At least one previous course in Art History or Visual Culture. 4 credits.