Courses In Art & Art History

ART 103. Visual Thinking. This course introduces concepts and skills that are essential for artists, art historians, and art educators. The focus is on building foundational principles (such as the visual elements in works of art) and studio art methodologies (such as the creative process, problem solving, and critiques). Students in the course will work individually and collaboratively on a variety of studio projects, will undertake a semester-long creative journaling project, visit galleries and museums in the region, and interact with visiting professional artists and art historians.  Prerequisite: Limited to art and art history majors and minors. 3 credits.

ART 112. Western Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval. An introduction to art and architecture from the ziggurats of Mesopotamia and the pyramids of dynastic Egypt to the temples of ancient Greece and Rome, the mosaics of Byzantium to the illuminated manuscripts and soaring cathedrals of medieval Europe. Each artwork and architectural structure is situated within its historical, social, economic, religious, and cultural context.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). 3 credits.

ART 114. Western Art II: Renaissance to Modern. Beginning with the rediscovery of antiquity and concluding with rise of modernity, this course examines the rapid transformation of Western art and architecture. Key stylistics movements include the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Romanticism, Neoclassicism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Cubism, Dada and Surrealism. Each artwork and architectural structure is situated within its historical, social, economic, religious, and cultural context.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). 3 credits.

ART 116. Non-Western Art: Africa to Oceania. An introductory survey course that focuses on the history, development, and cultural influences of non-Western art. The course will examine the traditions of art and architecture from various regions, including Africa, Arabia, India, China, Japan, the Americas, and Oceania. Geographically, the course moves from Africa through the Middle East and into central Asia, extending both south and east. The course then continues across the Pacific to examine the native North American region and the cultures within South America, including Mesoamerican and Andean. The course finishes with cultures on the western Pacific Rim, including the Australian Aboriginal and the New Zealand Maori.  Fulfills general education requirement: Intercultural Diversity. 3 credits.

ART 205. Drawing I: Material and Form. The primary goal of this course is learning to draw as a way of seeing and recording visual information from the world around us. Students are trained in the techniques of sighting, measuring, and perspective by drawing from objects, interior spaces, and human form. Assignments also require students to create images independently from a variety of sources, in addition to working in a drawing journal for the duration of the course. Charcoal, graphite, pastel, and ink are the primary media.  3 credits.

ART 209. Sculpture I: Material and Form. This course focuses on the principles of three-dimensional design and the properties of various sculptural materials, including plaster, clay, metal, and wood. Students learn techniques of modeling, carving, mold-making, metalworking, and assemblage through a variety of projects in which individual ideas are explored, executed, and refined.  3 credits.

ART 211. Darkroom Photography. The technical, aesthetic, and conceptual elements of photography as a contemporary art form are the basis of this course. Students are introduced to the mechanics of the Single Lens Reflex camera, processes of film development and black-and-white printing, compositional and aesthetic principles, and thematic explorations of subject matter. Issues of photographic history and contemporary photography are also examined. SLR camera with manual mode required.  3 credits.

ART 214. History of Photography. This course covers the history of photography with emphasis on the aesthetic elements of traditional and contemporary work. The significance of technical developments, photographic processes, and photographic criticism is discussed. It provides a contextual study of photography, not only as an art form but as a social commentary on culture. Content includes the history of the photography from the early 19th century to the present, including the introduction of color, photography as a form of social documentation, Modernist and Postmodernist approaches to the medium, photojournalism, and the use of photography within popular culture.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). 3 credits.

ART 217. Drawing II: The Human Form. Emphasizing human anatomy and movement, this course teaches important figurative skills for the aspiring artist, illustrator, or art teacher. Important components include proportion, light and shadow, and thematic development in addition to expressive use of various drawing media. Historical and contemporary figurative art is used to illuminate and inspire the development of individual approaches to drawing.  Prerequisite: ART 205 or by permission. 3 credits.

ART 219. Painting I: Color and Form. This course introduces the physical, visual, and conceptual properties of painting through a variety of projects created in the medium of oil paint. Students learn concepts of color space, paint weight, and pictorial structure by undertaking paintings in genres such as still life, self-portraiture, landscape, and interior. Issues from the history of painting are used to explore the philosophical underpinnings of the medium.  Prerequisite: ART 103 or 205. 3 credits.

ART 221. Painting II: Water-Based Media. This course explores the unique properties of wet media such as acrylic, gouache, ink, and watercolor. Individual development is emphasized through projects designed to both refine representational ability and expand the expressive parameters of painting.  Prerequisite: ART 103 or ART 205. 3 credits.

ART 223. Ceramics I: Material and Form. Students explore a number of essential ceramic techniques, such as pinch-, coil-, and slab-construction, wheel-throwing, and a range of low-temperature surface treatments. The course focuses on fundamental principles of sculptural and functional design, with reference to ceramic history and contemporary uses of the medium.  3 credits.

ART 225. Printmaking. In this course students experience a variety of techniques and approaches from the history of printmaking, including relief printing and intaglio, while exploring contemporary graphic aspects of the medium such as hand-made posters and monotypes.  Prerequisite: ART 103 or 205. 3 credits.

ART 231. Digital Photography. This course introduces students to the foundations of digital photography as an art form. Technical aspects, including lighting, shutter speed, and composition, are developed based on examples from historical and contemporary photography. A variety of subjects are photographed and processed using computer software, with an emphasis on the development of personal motifs and approaches to the art of photography. Digital Single Lens Reflex camera required.  3 credits.

ART 305. Drawing III: Illustration. Drawing as a way of telling stories is the focus of this course, which builds upon representational skills in the creation of visual narratives suitable for aesthetic and commercial applications. Both the history of drawing and contemporary illustration are incorporated as sources for individual development.  Prerequisite: ART 205 or 217. 3 credits.

ART 309. Pastel. This course introduces students to the visual and tactile properties of pastel and explores the expressive potential of the medium through a variety of techniques, from non-directional mark-making to edge-building. Attention is paid to the history of pastel and to basic rules of conservation and framing.  Prerequisite: ART 205 or by permission. 3 credits.

ART 311. Photography II: Concept and Technique. This course will build upon established principles of composition, light, and technique using film-based and digital photography. Rather than choosing one medium over the other, students will experiment with both film and digital photography, exploring connections between the two and establishing a personal style or approach through one or the other (or both). Topics may include narrative, portraiture, and the development of a personal visual approach to creating images.  Prerequisites: ART 211 or ART 231. 3 credits.

ART 312. Renaissance Art. Focusing on the late thirteenth to the end of the sixteenth century, this course offers a comprehensive survey of the major monuments, themes, and developments of Renaissance art in Europe. Works by Giotto, Van Eyck, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Dürer, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian, among others, are examined.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). Prerequisite: ART 112 or ART 114. 3 credits.

ART 315. Sculpture II: Material and Concept. This course offers an intensive exploration of three-dimensional object making, extending beyond fundamental techniques to more advanced areas of development within the fields of contemporary art and design. Themes include the body, the environment, and performance.  Prerequisites: ART 209 or by permission. 3 credits.

ART 316. Baroque Art. This course is a pan-European survey of baroque art and architecture, focusing on artists working in Italy, France, Spain, England, Flanders, and the Dutch Republic. Artworks by Caravaggio, Bernini, Borromini, and Velázquez in southern Europe, and Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Poussin, and Christopher Wren in Northern Europe, will be highlighted. Students explore such issues as patronage, stylistic difference, the interconnection of art and religion, and the changing political climate of Europe.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). Prerequisite: ART 112 or ART 114. 3 credits.

ART 319. Painting III: Concept and Technique. In this course students continue the development of artistic skills and conceptual approaches to painting. Projects include portraiture, abstraction, and the development of a painted series in which a theme or motif is used as the basis for a consistent group of paintings. Emphasis is on process, technique, and individual conceptual investigation.  Prerequisites: ART 219 or 221. 3 credits.

ART 320. Art and Revolution: 1776 to 1863. Covering the period from the American Revolution in 1776 to the controversial Salon des Refusés of 1863, this course examines the art of Europe and the North America as it undergoes turbulent cultural change. Cataclysmic events such as the American and French Revolution, the economic and technological changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution, and the various revolutions in thought and politics, such as The Enlightenment and the rise of Marxism, emerge as key driving agents in the transformation of art and architecture during the period. Art movements under examination include Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). Prerequisites: ART 112 or ART 114. 3 credits.

ART 323. Ceramics II: Material and Concept. This course extends the art medium of ceramics through the development of more advanced skills and ideas. Students pursue an individual style in various projects by developing new concepts and techniques. Students are required to seek out influences through research, and to reference historical and contemporary examples in their own work. Critiques at different stages of each project maximize the potential of each artwork. Students also play a role in the organization and management of the ceramics studio, learning to perform important functions from recycling clay to firing kilns.  Prerequisite: ART 223. 3 credits.

ART 328. Modern Art. An overview of modern art and architecture from the 1890s to the rise of postmodernism in the 1970s, including important stylistic movements such as Symbolism, Art Nouveau, Cubism, Dada and Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Pop Art, and Conceptual Art. The focus will be on the ideas, works, and critical reception of specific artists, widened to include issues of science and technology, race and gender, and related developments in politics and literature.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). Prerequisite: ART 114, or by permission of the instructor. 3 credits.

ART 330. Contemporary Art: 1980 to Present. This course explores the cultural and theoretical underpinnings of the contemporary art world. Focusing on the past three decades, the course examines those key elements that define art today, such as the art market, the media, controversy and debate, new modes of practice, and the rising context of the global. By tracing the diverse narratives that inform the art world, the student will understand how contemporary art and architecture generate meaning, and what methods and theories are employed in critiquing emerging forms.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). Prerequisite: ART 114, or by permission of the instructor. 3 credits.

ART 332. Art and the Moving Image. This course examines the interrelationship of art history and film studies from the origins of photography and cinema in the 1800s to the present day. Specific examples of filmmakers and artists are examined, as well as various art movements including Cubism, Surrealism, and Postmodernism.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 5 (Literature and Fine Art). Prerequisite: ART 114, or by permission of the instructor. 3 credits.

ART 340. Museum Studies. This course broadly examines the history, principles, and practices of museums. Though much of the focus is on museums of art, students investigate issues related to all museums, including the development, care, and use of ¬museum collections; the function, management, and operation of museums; curatorial methods and exhibition design; and research and catalogue writing.  Prerequisites: ART 112 or ART 114. 3 credits.

ART 351. Color and Culture. This course immerses students in a thematic investigation of color in human culture from ancient times to the present. Using case studies from the histories of art, literature, and philosophy, students examine the role color plays in our understanding of the world, particularly in relation to economic, moral, and spiritual value systems.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Disciplinary Perspectives. 3 credits.

ART 390. Special Topics. Special Topics in Art and Art History Topic to be announced  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, or by permission of the instructor. Limited to AAH majors and minors. 3 credits.

ART 391. Special Topics in Art History. Special Topics in Art History Topic to be Announced  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. 3 credits.

ART 392. Special Topics in Studio Art. Art and Art History Special Topics in Studio Art Topic to be announced  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. 3 credits.

ART 400. Internship. Internship in Art and Art History  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. 1-12 credits.

ART 404. Art History: Theory and Method. This course explores the various analytical tools available to those working within the discipline of art history. The course will explore those key methodologies that have been employed in the interpretation and description of art since the 19th century, which include formal analysis, iconography, Marxism, feminism, biography and autobiography, psychoanalysis, structuralism, race and gender, and new methods from ecology and other emerging environmental fields.  Prerequisites: ART 112 and 114. 3 credits.

ART 405. Advanced Studio. For junior or senior students who have completed foundation and intermediate-level courses in studio art and are ready to work independently while receiving faculty guidance and feedback. Working in a medium of one's choice (for example, ceramics or painting or photography), students create and present a resolved body of work.  The course can be repeated so that students can undertake different creative projects or work continuously on a sustained project, either one of which is essential for future work as an artist or art educator. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing or by permission; limited to art and art history majors and minors. 3 credits.

ART 406. Portfolio & Professional Development. This course prepares art and art history students for future professional work in the visual arts by providing developmental guidance at the critical junior or senior years. Students will explore the various opportunities open to studio artists, art historians, and art educators. Central to the class is the development of a refined art portfolio and/or writing sample that can be utilized in various vocational art fields and within the graduate school application process.  Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing or by permission; limited to art and art history majors and minors. 3 credits.