Overview

Your FYE will develop your critical thinking and communication skills, while also supporting you through your transition into college life. FYE classes have two components: first, a core 3-credit class focused on traditional academic skills like writing and analysis, and, second, a companion 1-credit class focused on transitional skills like coping with stress, planning for your career, managing time, and understanding major and general education (here called “Constellation”) requirements. Transfer students will take a different version of this 1-credit class that is tailored to supporting their successful transition to LVC.

Your FYE will provide you not only with the skills necessary to succeed academically at LVC, but also the community and relationships necessary to thrive here so that you will be ready to take advantage of the many opportunities LVC offers. 

Please take a few minutes to review the FYE requirements and sections that are scheduled for Fall 2022. You will make your FYE selections in advance of New Student Advising, which begins in May.

FYE Requirements

  • FYE 111 First-Year Experience I and FYE 111C FYE Companion (4 credits) are required in the first semester for first-year or transfer students who have not previously satisfied FYE 111 due to transfer credit (as indicated on a transfer evaluation form), Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate credit. If you are unsure whether you will be awarded FYE 111 credit, you should register for FYE 111 and the Registrar's Office will change your registration later, if necessary.
  • Both FYE 112 First-Year Experience II (3 credits) and FYE 112C Intro. to the First-Year Experience Companion (1 credit) must be taken by first-year students who have received prior credit for FYE 111.
  • FYE 112TR First-Year Experience II (3 credits) must be taken by transfer students who have received prior credit for FYE 111 but not 112.
  • FYE 113 must be taken by transfer students who have received prior credit for FYE 111.
  • Students pursuing a second bachelor's degree are exempt from taking any FYE course.

FYE 111H First-Year Experience I (4 credits) – Special-Purpose Courses

Students who have enrolled in the honors program are asked to select one of the following FYE courses.

FYE-111H-01 For the Love of the World

On Thought, Action, and Sustainability

This course is reserved for incoming Honors students. The readings and assignments will be built around the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals that aim to provide "a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future." Class discussions will tap into students' own curiosity, passion, creativity, and sense of responsibility to include a distinctive learner-directed environment and philosophy that are the hallmarks of an Honors program.

Instructor: J.Robbins

Day/Time: TTH 8–9:20 a.m.

Companion: M 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE-111H-02 For the Love of the World

On Thought, Action, and Sustainability

This course is reserved for incoming Honors students. The readings and assignments will be built around the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals that aim to provide "a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future." Class discussions will tap into students' own curiosity, passion, creativity, and sense of responsibility to include a distinctive learner-directed environment and philosophy that are the hallmarks of an Honors program.

Instructor: J.Robbins

Day/Time: TTH 9:30–10:50 a.m.

Companion: W 3–3:50 p.m.

FYE-111H-03 How to Speak Science

Using scientific information is key to meeting society’s challenges, including those related to social equity and environmental sustainability. This class will train you to communicate science efficiently and engagingly with a variety of audiences. We’ll use improv games, written work, research, and creative projects to help you learn to become an expert on a subject and share that expertise with others to solve problems and build a better future.

Instructor: E.Sterner

Day/Time: TTH 12:30–1:50 p.m.

Companion: M 8–8:50 a.m.

The following FYE may be taken by Exploratory (undecided) majors.

FYE-111-19 Making Major Decisions

Do you feel you are the only student undecided about your college major? Would you like to have an answer to the nagging question "So, what's your major?" It's normal to feel a little overwhelmed about how you will make this decision. This course will help students to understand the connection between major and career. Your college major opens the doorway to many career possibilities, but it's up to you to make the most of your experience both in and out of the classroom. The world of work today is complex and dynamic. Through applied learning including interactive experiences, texts, film, and podcasts, students will critically examine and explore academic majors available at LVC. This course is restricted for Exploratory majors only.

Instructor: E. Julian & S. Bartz

Day/Time: TTH 12:30–1:50 p.m.

Companion: W 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE 111 First-Year Experience I (4 credits) – General-Purpose Courses

The following courses are open to all students who are required to take FYE 111, and who are not assigned to one of the special-purpose sections.

FYE-111-01 To the Ends of the Earth

Why are human beings fascinated with the unknown and the dangerous? Why will some people take enormous risks in the world's most forbidding environments, just to reach the extreme limits of human endurance? This seminar invites students into the story of polar expeditions and the often-fatal attraction that exploration as organized risk-taking exerts on our fellow humans. Will skill, luck, organizing ability, and determination combine to find the fabled Northwest Passage, win the races to be first at the North and South Poles, and come back alive, or will carelessness, lack of foresight, and character flaws be exposed ruthlessly and lead to defeat, disgrace, destruction, and even (shudder!) cannibalism?

Instructor: K. Pry

Day/Time: MWF 8–8:50 a.m.

Companion: M 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE-111-02 To the Ends of the Earth

Why are human beings fascinated with the unknown and the dangerous? Why will some people take enormous risks in the world's most forbidding environments, just to reach the extreme limits of human endurance? This seminar invites students into the story of polar expeditions and the often-fatal attraction that exploration as organized risk-taking exerts on our fellow humans. Will skill, luck, organizing ability, and determination combine to find the fabled Northwest Passage, win the races to be first at the North and South Poles, and come back alive, or will carelessness, lack of foresight, and character flaws be exposed ruthlessly and lead to defeat, disgrace, destruction, and even (shudder!) cannibalism?

Instructor: K. Pry

Day/Time: MWF 9–9:50 a.m.

Companion: W 3–3:50 p.m.

FYE-111-03 Social Justice: Doing Right

This class seeks to empower students to move beyond notions of "common sense" and mere opinion on ideas of social justice. Drawing on academic literature, popular culture, and experiences in their own lives, students will critically engage fundamental ideas of justice, freedom, and society and complex issues of social inequality, oppression, and structural violence. Students will explore issues of justice that impact our social identities (race, gender, ethnicity, class, religion, sexualities, ability, and body image) and show up in every level of culture (education, politics, social media, entertainment, and religious/spiritual life). Students will develop the skills to not only engage these issues intellectually but reflect on how these concepts operate in their daily lives intellectually, emotionally, and bodily. Priority for this FYE is given to students who have enrolled in the Social Justice learning community.

Instructor: M. Sayers

Day/Time: MWF 9–9:50 a.m.

Companion: W 3–3:50 p.m.

FYE-111-05 Adapt/Survive

Writers and creators often adapt traditional stories, retelling them for new generations, new audiences, and new purposes. This class will study texts and various adaptations of them, across books, films, and television series, exploring and analyzing the effects of adaptation. By considering combinations of texts like Arsene Lupin, Gentleman Thief and the 2021 Netflix adaptation Lupin, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and 2021 adaptation The Green Knight, or various treatments of long-familiar stories from fairy tales to Shakespeare, we'll investigate what is added, what is emphasized, and what continues to speak to us across differing iterations of the story.

Instructor: H. Wendt

Day/Time: MWF 10–10:50 a.m.

Companion: T 8:30–9:20 a.m.

FYE-111-06 Adapt/Survive

Writers and creators often adapt traditional stories, retelling them for new generations, new audiences, and new purposes. This class will study texts and various adaptations of them, across books, films, and television series, exploring and analyzing the effects of adaptation. By considering combinations of texts like Arsene Lupin, Gentleman Thief and the 2021 Netflix adaptation Lupin, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and 2021 adaptation The Green Knight, or various treatments of long-familiar stories from fairy tales to Shakespeare, we'll investigate what is added, what is emphasized, and what continues to speak to us across differing iterations of the story.

Instructor: H. Wendt

Day/Time: MWF 11–11:50 a.m.

Companion: TH 8:30–9:20 a.m.

FYE-111-07: All in the Mind

Our brain makes us who we are. It regulates how we think, what we remember, how we react to situations, how we speak, and how we move.  This seminar explores the brain from a dysfunction perspective by incorporating how brain diseases and injury affect behavior and function. There are many famous cases such as those of Phineas Gage and Louis Victor Leborgne and stories illustrated by Oliver Sacks and others that have provided great insight into the relationship between brain anatomy and function. In this seminar, we will use books, short stories, research articles, and films to discuss this relationship and to also explore how recent advances in neuroscience have helped us to better understand how the brain works.

Instructor: E. Unger

Day/Time: MWF 11–11:50 a.m.

Companion: M 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE 111-08 Walk, Write, Think, Live

Even in our modern automobile-dependent society, almost everyone walks for exercise, for stress relief, in political protest, for meditation, or just as a spur to thinking and creativity. In this class, we will design our own walking-based contemplative and/or creative practices and will use these practices as a spur to various kinds of writing, discussion, and artmaking. In the process, we'll read, watch, and look at the work of writers, thinkers, and artists for whom walking has been an important part of their process. We'll also ask questions: what do thinkers gain by integrating a walking practice into their creative and intellectual work? What happens when we draw parallels between our inner landscapes and the landscapes we inhabit or pass through? How do people with different bodies, backgrounds, and abilities “take a walk”?

Instructor: MC. Hyland

Day/Time: MWF 12–12:50 p.m.

Companion: T 8:30–9:20 a.m.

FYE-111-09 The Body in Art

Our human body defines our species. Our complex living system is the seat of consciousness and the machine that replicates and transmits our code for continued life. As the physical extension and stored repository of our worldly experiences, our body is crucial to self-identity. It is no surprise, then, that the depiction of the body is central to art. Our desires, our self-doubts, and our prejudices are all found in the way we represent ourselves. Through various modes of critical thinking, writing, and artmaking we will uncover, complicate, and question the history of human embodiment in the visual arts.

Instructor: G. Taylor

Day/Time: MWF 1–1:50 p.m.

Companion: W 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE-111-10 The Body in Art

Our human body defines our species. Our complex living system is the seat of consciousness and the machine that replicates and transmits our code for continued life. As the physical extension and stored repository of our worldly experiences, our body is crucial to self-identity. It is no surprise, then, that the depiction of the body is central to art. Our desires, our self-doubts, and our prejudices are all found in the way we represent ourselves. Through various modes of critical thinking, writing, and artmaking we will uncover, complicate, and question the history of human embodiment in the visual arts.

Instructor: G. Taylor

Day/Time: MWF 2–2:50 p.m.

Companion: TH 8:30–9:20 a.m.

FYE-111-11 Questions of Life & Death

In this course, students will explore the fundamental questions of life and death. They will examine and criticize the most basic ideas: what is life, when does life begin, when does a human life begin, what is death, how can we tell when someone is dead. Examining both medical and philosophical sides of key debates about life and death, students will engage with both practical and intellectual aspects of key medical decisions that relate to questions of life and death. Beyond debates about the beginning and end of life, they will discuss the issues of life and death that we face throughout our lives: what it means to truly live, is healthcare a right, do I have a right to die, when is it permissible to kill?

Instructor: M. Sayers

Day/Time: MWF 2–2:50 p.m.

Companion: W 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE-111-12 It’s Your Money

It's never too early to begin thinking about what you will do with your money as a young professional. What are your financial goals? Do you know how to reach them? This course explores how to manage your personal finances from credit sources to financing a home, from insurance to investing, and all things in between. Students will explore concepts and understand tools they need to make smart financial decisions with their money, from graduation until retirement. We will learn through discussion, analysis of scenarios, and problem solving to show how small decisions can have big impacts on our financial futures. In addition, we will have guest speakers from financial institutions to discuss factors that will impact borrowing and credit scores to get students on the right path for financial success.

Instructor: L. Long

Day/Time: MWF 2–2:50 p.m.

Companion: F 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE-111-13 Race in the 21st Century

In this seminar, we will investigate race as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon in the contemporary United States. By examining a variety of materials, including television, film, novels, and essays (e.g., Dear White People, Black Panther, Underground Railroad, Robin DiAngelo's White Fragility) we will analyze how the concept of race is perceived, experienced, challenged, and constructed in this historical moment. First semester will focus on history and theory. Themes and topics to be covered in FYE 111 include race and identity, and race and social relations.

Instructor: C. Romagnolo

Day/Time: MW 2–3:20 p.m.

Companion: M 8–8:50 a.m.

FYE-111-14 Race in the 21st Century

In this seminar, we will investigate race as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon in the contemporary United States. By examining a variety of materials, including television, film, novels, and essays (e.g., Dear White People, Black Panther, Underground Railroad, Robin DiAngelo's White Fragility) we will analyze how the concept of race is perceived, experienced, challenged, and constructed in this historical moment. First semester will focus on history and theory. Themes and topics to be covered in FYE 111 include race and identity, and race and social relations.

Instructor: C. Romagnolo

Day/Time: MW 3:30–4:50 p.m.

Companion: W 8–8:50 a.m.

FYE-111-15 Good Questions

Asking good questions lies at the foundation of every serious academic discipline, along with the ability to articulate follow-up questions, potential answers, and challenges to those questions and answers.  In this seminar we’ll read, discuss, and write about four books—Janet Lewis’s The Wife of Martin Guerre (about a historical mystery), John Wyndham’s The Chrysalids (a 1950s science fiction novel), Plato’s Symposium (a late-night party at which Socrates and his friends drink a fair amount of wine and try to define “love”), and Shakespeare’s The Tempest (a play about justice and power, betrayal and forgiveness)—each of which raises these kinds of questions and asks us what we think.  

Instructor: G. Grieve-Carlson

Day/Time: TTH 8–9:20 a.m.

Companion: F 8–8:50 a.m.

FYE-111-16 Good Questions

Asking good questions lies at the foundation of every serious academic discipline, along with the ability to articulate follow-up questions, potential answers, and challenges to those questions and answers.  In this seminar we’ll read, discuss, and write about four books—Janet Lewis’s The Wife of Martin Guerre (about a historical mystery), John Wyndham’s The Chrysalids (a 1950s science fiction novel), Plato’s Symposium (a late-night party at which Socrates and his friends drink a fair amount of wine and try to define “love”), and Shakespeare’s The Tempest (a play about justice and power, betrayal and forgiveness)—each of which raises these kinds of questions and asks us what we think. 

Instructor: G. Grieve-Carlson

Day/Time: TTH 9:30–10:50 a.m.

Companion: T 8:30–9:20 a.m.

FYE-111-17 Sports Journalism

Students will study how sports have impacted our society and how the media has shaped the relationship. We will study the history of sports journalism, and students will read and analyze a variety of writing styles from sportswriters in all media, including broadcast, print, and the web. We will also analyze how sports feature stories attract an audience who may not be avid sports fans; it's the power of words that brings us together.

Instructor: J. Fettrow-Alderfer

Day/Time: TTH 9:30–10:50 a.m.

Companion: F 12:00–12:50 p.m.

FYE-111-18 The Good Life

What is the "good life?" Does wearing the motto saying so make it so? Does going to college for a better life make it so? In a world where just about everything is for sale, how is the good life not also? Questions concerning the good and the good life have long been explored. In this course, we will examine how our understanding of what makes a good life may be shaped or derailed by social media, modern lifestyles, globalization, branding, racism, or the desire to have it all! We'll read different types of texts, from philosophy to fiction to op-eds. We'll also watch big screen and TV films. Foremost, we will emphasize how writing is not just for papers and grades, but for finding one's voice and learning how to think. Class will be discussion-based, around a text or a film, to promote dialogue and understanding. Writing assignments will promote the intellectual skills of inquiry and analysis and encourage you to examine your own moral commitments and vision for social responsibility.

Instructor: N. Vahanian

Day/Time: TTH 9:30–10:50 a.m.

Companion: TH 8:30–9:20 a.m.

FYE-111-20 Once Upon a Time: Adaptations

And they lived happily ever after. Whether there be ogres, monsters, princes, witches, talking frogs, evil stepmothers, or magic beans; almost every fairy tale has one thing in common - the happily ever after. But if fairy tales are the stuff of childhood, why do they crop up in the adult world through films like the steampunk gore rendition of Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters or the feminist retelling Maleficent, procedural TV shows like Grimm and Beauty and the Beast, or ads for Chanel No.5 and Adidas? We will explore the frame narratives of the "classic" fairy tales of the Grimm brothers and Charles Perrault in the hands of twentieth-century writers to reflect on modern renditions of the "ever after" myth. The class will investigate the validity of fairytales in an era of reworkings and adaptations through various readings, music videos, films, ads, etc.

Instructor: S. Bhattacharya

Day/Time: TTH 12:30–1:50 p.m.

Companion: M 8–8:50 a.m.

FYE-111-21 Once Upon a Time: Adaptations

And they lived happily ever after. Whether there be ogres, monsters, princes, witches, talking frogs, evil stepmothers, or magic beans; almost every fairy tale has one thing in common - the happily ever after. But if fairy tales are the stuff of childhood, why do they crop up in the adult world through films like the steampunk gore rendition of Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters or the feminist retelling Maleficent, procedural TV shows like Grimm and Beauty and the Beast, or ads for Chanel No.5 and Adidas? We will explore the frame narratives of the "classic" fairy tales of the Grimm brothers and Charles Perrault in the hands of twentieth-century writers to reflect on modern renditions of the "ever after" myth. The class will investigate the validity of fairytales in an era of reworkings and adaptations through various readings, music videos, films, ads, etc.

Instructor: S. Bhattacharya

Day/Time: TTH 2–3:20 p.m.

Companion: W 3–3:50 p.m.

FYE-111-22 Film and Society

This course seeks to develop the sociological imagination through an examination of the way in which film both influences, and is influenced by, dominant social and cultural ideology. Integral to the course is an analysis of the role of the filmmaker as artist, investigating the figure's historically dichotomous role as both social subversive and propagandist. This semester, a special focus will be given to the portrayal of the monster in science fiction, horror, and comedy.

Instructor: A. Owen

Day/Time: TTH 2–3:20 p.m.

Companion: M 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE 112 First-Year Experience II (3-4 credits)

The following courses are open to first-year students who are required to take FYE 112 (3 credits). A 1-credit FYE 112C companion course is also required.

FYE-112-01 The American Dream

The American Dream. Is it still attainable for people in the US? This course will continually pose and attempt to answer this question through the examination of a selection of artifacts including literature, sociological research, and film. Specific readings will provide ample points of discussion specifically considering the impact of education, socioeconomic class, technology, and identities on our ability to achieve individual success. Frequent viewings of media including Inequality for All and Humans will provide more touchpoints to extend the conversation. 

Instructor: T. Rosenberg

Day/Time: MWF 11–11:50 a.m.

Companion: M 12–12:50 p.m.

FYE-112-02 Leadership Through Film

When working to develop personal leadership skills, we can use films to understand and further develop authentic leadership beliefs. This course focuses on the attributes, nuances, and quandaries of leadership. We will watch films throughout the course and analyze, critically review, and discuss the various leaders we observe. We will debate the value of the leader’s skills and determine which, if any, we would adopt as our own. Much of the course is dialogue and analysis in large group discussions and debate.  

Instructor: B. Bertram

Day/Time: TTH 9:30–10:50 a.m.

Companion: TH 8:30–9:20 a.m.

FYE-112-03 Amish

Amish and similar groups have been a part of Pennsylvania for a long time, but they also live in 30 other states and beyond. They are often seen as outsiders, imagined as saints, or as a group with dark secrets. They have become a part of pop culture, from tourism and furniture to romance novels. In this course, we will explore the main ideas and beliefs of Amish and the main ways how non-Amish perceive them. We will analyze how Amish are depicted in pop culture, for example, literature, television, and movies, to answer the questions: why do the Amish live that way, and why are they so fascinating to many of us?

Instructor: J. Meindl

Day/Time: TTH 9:30–10:50 a.m.

Companion: M 8–8:50 a.m.

FYE-112-04 Going Viral

Social media is omnipresent; few companies would miss out on the opportunity to brand themselves via social media and few people are resolute enough to quit social media or never start using it. Social media connects us and divides us, and we are only just beginning to see the impact this latest human communications revolution is having on our lives and our world. In this class, we'll look at how to leverage the productive parts of social media and critique the more troublesome aspects. We'll consider data gathering, targeted advertising, censorship, and propaganda and how each affects social media users worldwide. Students learn how we arrived at the present collection of social media platforms and develop hypotheses regarding where the future will take us, technologically and socially.

Instructor: M. Pettice

Day/Time: TTH 8:00–9:20 a.m.

Companion: W 3–3:50 p.m.

The following course is open to transfer students who are required to take FYE 112 (3 credits). Transfer students may also take FYE 112 in the spring semester, when more options will be offered. Students must also take FYE 113 (1 credit), which can be scheduled independently from FYE 112.

FYE-112TR-01 Games and Learning

Playing games is one of the most popular leisure activities in the world, however, there is a great link between games learning. In this course, we will explore the role and function of games for learning with a focus on design, to ultimately create a game to use as a learning tool based on research. Students will play and analyze games while reading current research and theory from a variety of sources in the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and industry.

Instructor: J. Laferriere

Day/Time: MWF 10–10:50 a.m.

FYE 113 Introduction to the First-Year Experience (1 credit)

The following courses are open to transfer students who are required to take FYE 113.

FYE-113-01 Intro to the LVC Experience (Transfer only)

Instructor: J. Tindall

Day/Time: T 8:30–9:20 a.m.

FYE-113-02 Intro to the LVC Experience (Transfer only)

Instructor: E. Maisto

Day/Time: W 12–12:50 p.m.