Alert

APRIL 21

Vaccine Clinic Friday—Make an Appointment Today

Penn State Health will hold a vaccine clinic on campus this Friday, April 23. Employees, students, and family members of employees aged 16 and older may make an appointment for their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

Overview

Your FYE will develop your critical thinking and communication skills, while also supporting you through your transition into college life. FYE classes have two components: first, a core 3-credit class focused on traditional academic skills like writing and analysis, and, second, a companion 1-credit class focused on transitional skills like coping with stress, planning for your career, managing time, and understanding major and general education (here called “Constellation”) requirements. Transfer students will take a different version of this 1-credit class that is tailored to supporting their successful transition to LVC.

Your FYE will provide you not only with the skills necessary to succeed academically at LVC, but also the community and relationships necessary to thrive here so that you will be ready to take advantage of the many opportunities LVC offers. 

Students who have not earned prior FYE credit through transfer credit, Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate coursework, must take FYE 111 First-Year Experience I and FYE 111C (FYE Companion).

Please take a few minutes to review the FYE requirements and sections that are scheduled for Fall 2021. You will make your FYE selections in advance of New Student Advising, which begins in May.

FYE Requirements

  • FYE 111 First-Year Experience I and FYE 111C FYE Companion (4 credits) are required in the first semester for first-year or transfer students who have not previously satisfied FYE 111 due to transfer credit (as indicated on a transfer evaluation form), Advanced Placement, or international Baccalaureate credit (indicated on transfer evaluation, above, if information has been provided). If you are unsure whether you will be awarded FYE 111 credit, you should register for FYE 111 and the Registrar's Office will change your registration later, if necessary.
  • Both FYE 112 First-Year Experience II (3 credits) and FYE 112C Intro. to the First-Year Experience Companion (1 credit) must be taken by first-year or transfer students who have received prior credit for FYE 111.
  • FYE 113 (only) must be taken by transfer students who have received prior credit for FYE 111 and 112.
  • Students pursuing a second bachelor's degree are exempt from taking any FYE course.

 

FYE 111 First-Year Experience I (4 credits) – Special-Purpose Courses

Students who have enrolled in the honors program are asked to select one of the following FYEs:

FYE-111-01 Law and Justice

This course is reserved for incoming honors students. Law and Justice explores the centrality of human rights within the rule of law. With a comparative focus on the US and British legal systems, this FYE examines the protection of civil liberties and rights (including those concerning reproduction, intimacy, and healthcare), the role and constitutional position of judges (and relatedly, the importance of judicial independence and diversity), the evolving development of the common law through precedent cases, and the obligations that arise under criminal and contract law, and torts.

Instructor: P. Benesch
Day/Time: MWF  2-2:50pm
Companion: W  8-8:50am

FYE-111-02 For the Love of the World: On Thought, Action, and Sustainability

This course is reserved for incoming honors students. The readings and assignments will be built around the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals that aim to provide "a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future." Class discussions will tap into students' own curiosity, passion, creativity, and sense of responsibility to include a distinctive learner-directed environment and philosophy that are the hallmarks of an Honors program.

Instructor: J. Robbins
Day/Time: TTH  8-9:20am
Companion: M  12-12:50pm

 

FYE-111-03 For the Love of the World: On Thought, Action, and Sustainability

This course is reserved for incoming honors students. The readings and assignments will be built around the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals that aim to provide "a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future." Class discussions will tap into students' own curiosity, passion, creativity, and sense of responsibility to include a distinctive learner-directed environment and philosophy that are the hallmarks of an Honors program.

Instructor: J. Robbins
Day/Time: TTH  9:30-10:50am
Companion: W  3-3:50pm

The following FYE may be taken by Exploratory (undecided) majors:

FYE-111-04 Making Major Decisions

Do you feel you are the only student undecided about your college major?  Would you like to have an answer to the nagging question "So, what's your major?" It's normal to feel a little overwhelmed about how you will make this decision. Nearly 80% of students entering college are still undecided about their major, and many students will switch majors at least once. This is all part of the normal exploration process. Making Major Decisions will help students to understand the connection between major and career.

Your college major opens the doorway to many career possibilities, but it's up to you to make the most of your experience both in and out of the classroom. The world of work today is complex and dynamic. Through applied learning including interactive experiences, texts, film, and podcasts, students will critically examine and explore academic majors available at LVC. You will be encouraged to explore majors in discussions with faculty and the staff from the Breen Center for Graduate Success, and exposed to career paths through self-assessment tools, readings, and informational interviews. There will be ample opportunity to evaluate your interests, explore possibilities that match by connecting with career professionals, and demonstrate intentional decision-making and action.  This course is restricted for Exploratory majors only and will require instructor permission to enroll.

Instructor: E. Julian and S. Bartz
Day/Time: TTH  12:30-1:50pm
Companion: W 12-12:50pm

The following FYEs may be taken by any student, with priority to students who have opted to participate in a Living-Learning Community:

FYE-111-05 Social Justice: Doing Right

This class seeks to empower students to move beyond notions of "common sense" and mere opinion on ideas of social justice.  Drawing on academic literature, popular culture, and experiences in their own lives, students will critically engage fundamental ideas of justice, freedom, and society and complex issues of social inequality, oppression, and structural violence. Students will explore issues of justice that impact our social identities (race, gender, ethnicity, class, religion, sexualities, ability, and body image) and show up in every level of culture (education, politics, social media, entertainment, and religious/spiritual life). Students will develop the skills to not only engage these issues intellectually, but reflect on how these concepts operate in their daily lives intellectually, emotionally, and bodily. Priority for this FYE is given to students who have enrolled in the Social Justice learning community.

Instructor: M. Sayers
Day/Time: MWF  9-9:50am
Companion: M  3-3:50pm

FYE-111-06 Risk/Benefit Sports/Phys. Act.

Sport and physical activity can have both negative and positive consequences. Students will explore both sides of the issue through thought-provoking discussions and activities. Taught by an international expert in sports injury epidemiology, topics will include comparing injury risk across various sports and forms of physical activity, and the positive effects that physical activity has on mental health, physical health, and society as a whole. Priority for this FYE is given to students who have enrolled in the Exercise Science learning community.

Instructor: T. Dompier
Day/Time: TTH 8-9:20am
Companion: F 12-12:50pm

FYE 111 First-Year Experience I (4 credits) – General-Purpose Courses

The following courses are open to all students who are required to take FYE 111 and are not assigned to one of the special-purpose sections, above.

FYE-111-07 To the Ends of the Earth

Why are human beings fascinated with the unknown and the dangerous? Why will some people take enormous risks in the world's most forbidding environments, just to reach the extreme limits of human endurance? This seminar invites students into the story of polar expeditions and the often-fatal attraction that exploration as organized risk-taking exerts on our fellow humans. Will skill, luck, organizing ability, and determination combine to find the fabled Northwest Passage, win the races to be first at the North and South Poles, and come back alive, or will carelessness, lack of foresight, and character flaws be exposed ruthlessly and lead to defeat, disgrace, destruction, and even (shudder!) cannibalism?

Instructor: K. Pry
Day/Time: MWF  8-8:50am
Companion: T  8:30-9:20am

FYE-111-08 To the Ends of the Earth

Why are human beings fascinated with the unknown and the dangerous? Why will some people take enormous risks in the world's most forbidding environments, just to reach the extreme limits of human endurance? This seminar invites students into the story of polar expeditions and the often-fatal attraction that exploration as organized risk-taking exerts on our fellow humans. Will skill, luck, organizing ability, and determination combine to find the fabled Northwest Passage, win the races to be first at the North and South Poles, and come back alive, or will carelessness, lack of foresight, and character flaws be exposed ruthlessly and lead to defeat, disgrace, destruction, and even (shudder!) cannibalism?

Instructor: K. Pry
Day/Time: MWF  9-9:50am
Companion: F  8-8:50am

FYE-111-10 Art and The Body

Our human body defines our species. Our complex living system is the seat of consciousness and the machine that replicates and transmits our code for continued life. As the physical extension and stored repository of our worldly experiences, our body is crucial to self-identity. It is no surprise, then, that the depiction of the body is central to art. Our desires, our self-doubts, and our prejudices are all found in the way we represent ourselves. Through various modes of critical thinking and writing, we will uncover, complicate, and question the history of human embodiment in the visual arts.

Instructor: G. Taylor
Day/Time: MWF  1-1:50pm
Companion: W  12-12:50pm

FYE-111-11 Resilient

This course helps us recognize characteristics of resilience, including its strengths and pitfalls. We will read stories and watch films about resilient people in challenging situations. We will discuss how to cultivate a positive resilience, make friends with our failures, and use difficult situations as opportunities for transformation. Course assignments will promote critical thinking and creativity, establishing the foundations and skills for lifelong learning.

Instructor: R. Norris
Day/Time: MWF  11-11:50am
Companion: M 12-12:50pm

FYE-111-12 Adapt, Survive

Writers and creators often adapt traditional stories, retelling them for new generations, new audiences, and new purposes. This class will study texts and various adaptations of them, across books, films, and television series, exploring and analyzing the effects of adaptation. By considering combinations of texts like Arsene Lupin, Gentleman Thief and the 2021 Netflix adaptation Lupin, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and adaptations ranging from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead to The Lion King, and others, we’ll investigate what is added, what is emphasized, and what continues to speak to us across differing iterations of the story. 

Instructor: H. Wendt
Day/Time: MWF  2-2:50pm
Companion: M  3-3:50pm

FYE-111-13 Adapt, Survive

Writers and creators often adapt traditional stories, retelling them for new generations, new audiences, and new purposes. This class will study texts and various adaptations of them, across books, films, and television series, exploring and analyzing the effects of adaptation. By considering combinations of texts like Arsene LupinGentleman Thief and the 2021 Netflix adaptation Lupin, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and adaptations ranging from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead to The Lion King, and others, we’ll investigate what is added, what is emphasized, and what continues to speak to us across differing iterations of the story. 

Instructor: H. Wendt
Day/Time: MWF  3-3:50pm
Companion: F  12-12:50pm

FYE-111-14 Race in the 21st Century

In this seminar, we will investigate race as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon in the contemporary United States. By examining a variety of materials, including television, film, novels, and essays (e.g., Dear White People, Black Panther, Underground Railroad, Robin DiAngelo's White Fragility) we will analyze how the concept of race is perceived, experienced, challenged, and constructed in this historical moment. First semester will focus on history and theory. Themes and topics to be covered in FYE 111 include race and identity, and race and social relations.

Instructor: C. Romagnolo
Day/Time: MW  2-3:20pm
Companion: Th 8:30-9:20am

FYE-111-15 Race in the 21st Century

In this seminar, we will investigate race as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon in the contemporary United States. By examining a variety of materials, including television, film, novels, and essays (e.g., Dear White People, Black Panther, Underground Railroad, Robin DiAngelo's White Fragility) we will analyze how the concept of race is perceived, experienced, challenged, and constructed in this historical moment. First semester will focus on history and theory. Themes and topics to be covered in FYE 111 include race and identity, and race and social relations.

Instructor: C. Romagnolo
Day/Time: MW  3-4:20pm
Companion: M 8-8:50am

FYE-111-16 What are We Fighting For?

“Fighting for” something (such as the right to vote, or the right to be paid fairly) can be inspiring, and fighting in self-defense or in the defense of others can be justifiable. But our species seems to be quite good at many kinds of fighting, not all of which are inspiring or justifiable. In this class, we’ll read and write about books by men and women that deal with characters who are fighting for something, as well as characters who are thrust into fighting through no choice of their own. We’ll think about the nature and impact of violence in people’s lives, and about how people respond to violence. Books may include Tim O’Brien’s In the Lake of the Woods, Pat Barker’s The Silence of the Girls, Valerie Martin’s Property, and Anand Giridharadas’s The True American.

Instructor: G. Grieve-Carlson
Day/Time: TTH  8-9:20am
Companion: M 12-12:50pm

FYE-111-17 What are We Fighting For?

“Fighting for” something (such as the right to vote, or the right to be paid fairly) can be inspiring, and fighting in self-defense or in the defense of others can be justifiable. But our species seems to be quite good at many kinds of fighting, not all of which are inspiring or justifiable. In this class, we’ll read and write about books by men and women that deal with characters who are fighting for something, as well as characters who are thrust into fighting through no choice of their own. We’ll think about the nature and impact of violence in people’s lives, and about how people respond to violence. Books may include Tim O’Brien’s In the Lake of the Woods, Pat Barker’s The Silence of the Girls, Valerie Martin’s Property, and Anand Giridharadas’s The True American.

Instructor: G. Grieve-Carlson
Day/Time: TTH  9:30-10:50am
Companion: TH 8:30-9:20am

FYE-111-18 Once Upon a Time: Adaptations

And they lived happily ever after…

Whether there be ogres, monsters, princes, witches, talking frogs, evil stepmothers, or magic beans; almost every fairy tale has one thing in common - the happily ever after. But if fairy tales are the stuff of childhood why do they crop up in the adult world through films like the steam punk gore rendition of Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters or the feminist retelling Maleficent, procedural TV shows like Grimm and Beauty and the Beast, or ads for Chanel No.5 and Adidas? We will explore the frame narratives of the "classic" fairy tales of the Grimm brothers and Charles Perrault in the hands of twentieth-century writers to reflect on modern renditions of the "ever after" myth. The class will investigate the validity of fairytales in an era of reworkings and adaptations through various readings, music videos, films, ads, etc.

Instructor: S. Bhattacharya
Day/Time: TTH  9:30-10:50am
Companion: T  8:30-9:20am

FYE-111-19 Sports Journalism

Students will study how sports have impacted our society and how the media has shaped the relationship. We will study the history of sports journalism, and students will read and analyze a variety of writing styles from sportswriters in all media, including broadcast, print, and the web.  We will also analyze how sports feature stories attract an audience who may not be avid sports fans; it's the power of words that brings us together.

Instructor: J. Fettrow-Alderfer
Day/Time: TTH  9:30-10:50am
Companion: T 8:30-9:20am

FYE-111-20 The Good Life? Part 1

What is the “good life?” Does wearing the motto saying so make it so? Does going to college for a better life make it so? In a world where just about everything is for sale, how is the good life not also? Questions concerning the good and the good life have long been explored. In this course, we will examine how our understanding of what makes a good life may be shaped or derailed by social media, modern lifestyles, globalization, branding, racism, or the desire to have it all! We’ll read different types of texts, from philosophy to fiction to op-eds. We’ll also watch big screen and TV films. Foremost, we will emphasize how writing is not just for papers and grades, but foremost for finding one’s voice and learning how to think. Class will be discussion-based, around a text or a film, to promote dialogue and understanding. Writing assignments will promote the intellectual skills of inquiry and analysis, and encourage you to examine your own moral commitments and vision for social responsibility.

Instructor: N. Vahanian
Day/Time: TTH  2-3:20pm
Companion: W 8-8:50am

FYE-111-21 Once Upon a Time: Adaptations

And they lived happily ever after…

Whether there be ogres, monsters, princes, witches, talking frogs, evil stepmothers, or magic beans; almost every fairy tale has one thing in common - the happily ever after. But if fairy tales are the stuff of childhood why do they crop up in the adult world through films like the steam punk gore rendition of Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters or the feminist retelling Maleficent, procedural TV shows like Grimm and Beauty and the Beast, or ads for Chanel No.5 and Adidas? We will explore the frame narratives of the "classic" fairy tales of the Grimm brothers and Charles Perrault in the hands of twentieth-century writers to reflect on modern renditions of the "ever after" myth. The class will investigate the validity of fairytales in an era of reworkings and adaptations through various readings, music videos, films, ads, etc.

Instructor: S. Bhattacharya
Day/Time: TTH  2-3:20pm
Companion: F  8-8:50am

FYE-111-22 Punk

Noise, rage, rebellion—this is the ethos of punk. For nearly 50 years, punk has endured as both an aggressive form of rock and roll and a subculture of non-conformity. This course explores the history and ideology of punk rock from 1970 to 1991, the year Nirvana catapulted into the mainstream and injected the underground aesthetic of buzzing guitars and frayed clothes into popular culture. We also examine the countercultural origins of punk in the art, music, and literature of the dada movement (1920s) and the beat generation (1950s). By learning about the ways that punk has built on the ideals of individuality and authenticity, students gain insight into the modern mediascape and its deep connection to our own identity. 

Instructor: M. Pittari
Day/Time: TTH  2-3:20pm
Companion: W 3-3:50pm

FYE-111-23 Film & Society

This course seeks to develop the sociological imagination through an examination of the way in which film both influences, and is influenced by, dominant social and cultural ideology. Integral to the course is an analysis of the role of the filmmaker as artist, investigating the figure’s historically dichotomous role as both social subversive and propagandist. This semester, a special focus will be given to the portrayal of the monster in science fiction, horror, and comedy. 

Instructor: A. Owen
Day/Time: TTH  2-3:20pm
Companion: W 12-12:50pm

FYE 112 First-Year Experience II (3-4 credits)

The following courses are open to first-year students who are required to take FYE 112 (3 credits). A 1-credit FYE 112C companion course is also required.

FYE-112-01 Civilization As We Know It

Beer, wine, and bread. Civilization would not have developed without these everyday items. Ancient peoples may not have known it, but all of these items are products of biotechnology. Today, biotechnology influences our health, what we eat, what we wear, how we heat our homes, and many other things we take for granted. In this three-credit First Year Experience II (FYE 112) course, you can expect to engage in intellectual inquiry. The primary focus of this course is on writing, with a secondary focus on critical reading. In this seminar-style course, you will read, discuss, and write about various aspects of biotechnology - its origins, its history, how it has influenced our evolution and continues to cause significant reason for introspection and debate in our society. Formulating ideas, developing arguments, and writing well-researched, information-supported essays are foundational skills that are essential for your success at LVC and beyond.

Instructor: W. Patton
Day/Time: MWF 9-9:50am
Companion: W 12-12:50pm

FYE-112-02 The American Dream

The American Dream. Is it still attainable for most people in the US? This course will continually pose and attempt to answer this question through the examination of a selection of artifacts including literature, sociological research, and film.  Specific readings, which include authors such as Malcolm Gladwell, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Jean Anyon, will provide ample points of discussion specifically considering the impact of education, socioeconomic class, technology, and ethnic identities on our ability to achieve individual success. Frequent viewings of media including Waiting for Superman, The Pursuit of Happyness, and Humans will provide more touchpoints to extend the conversation. An extended research paper and a semester-long group project are required components of this course.

Instructor: T. Rosenberg
Day/Time: MWF  11-11:50am
Companion: M 8-8:50am

FYE-112-03 The American Dream

The American Dream. Is it still attainable for most people in the US? This course will continually pose and attempt to answer this question through the examination of a selection of artifacts including literature, sociological research, and film.  Specific readings, which include authors such as Malcolm Gladwell, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Jean Anyon, will provide ample points of discussion specifically considering the impact of education, socioeconomic class, technology, and ethnic identities on our ability to achieve individual success. Frequent viewings of media including Waiting for Superman, The Pursuit of Happyness, and Humans will provide more touchpoints to extend the conversation. An extended research paper and a semester-long group project are required components of this course.

Instructor: T. Rosenberg
Day/Time: MWF  1-1:50pm
Companion: F  12-12:50pm

The following course is open to transfer students who are required to take FYE 112 (3 credits). Transfer students may also take FYE 112 in the spring semester, when more options will be offered. Students must also take FYE 113 (1 credit), which can be scheduled independently from FYE 112.

FYE-112-04 Going Viral

Social media is omnipresent; few companies would miss out on the opportunity to brand themselves via social media and few people are resolute enough to quit social media or never start using it. Social media connects us and divides us, and we are only just beginning to see the impact this latest human communications revolution is having on our lives and our world. In this class, we’ll look at how to leverage the productive parts of social media and critique the more troublesome aspects. We’ll consider data gathering, targeted advertising, censorship, and propaganda and how each affects social media users worldwide. Students will learn how we arrived at the present collection of social media platforms and develop hypotheses regarding where the future will take us, technologically and socially.

Instructor: M. Pettice
Day/Time: MWF 10-10:50am

FYE 113 Introduction to the First-Year Experience (1 credit)

The following courses are open to transfer students who are required to take FYE 113.

FYE-113-01 Intro to the LVC Experience (Transfer only)

Instructor: H. Stone

Day/Time: W 3-3:50pm

FYE-113-02 Intro to the LVC Experience (Transfer only)

Instructor: K. Gonzalez

Day/Time: M 12-12:50pm