Alert

MAY 14

COVID-19 Information

COVID-19 vaccines now available to all groups in PA. Let LVC know when you are fully vaccinated. Students are required to fill out the Symptom Tracker every day.

Check out the variety of educational sessions available to further your knowledge and encourage dialogue around Inclusive Excellence. Choose two educational sessions—one from 1–2 p.m. and one from 2:15–3:15 p.m.—OR one of the following sessions from 1–3:30 p.m.: BaFa BaFa, Poverty Simulation, Intergroup Dialogue, or Finding a Common Ground Workshop.

1–3:30 p.m. | Interactive Game, Workshop, Intergroup Dialogue, or Simulation

BaFa BaFa | Room 186, Clyde A. Lynch ’18 Memorial Hall

What role does culture play in your daily interactions? In this interactive "BaFa BaFa" game, participants will come face-to-face with those of a different culture and will experience the feelings that build when cultural values are not congruent.

This simulation challenges stereotypes and empowers participants to leave the simulation with a better understanding of the value of diversity and the insight necessary to communicate and work with those who are different from themselves.

Facilitated by Theresa Rosenberg, assistant professor of English, and Donna Miller, instruction and reference librarian.

Finding a Common Ground Workshop: Theatre of Oppression | Lutz Hall, Bertha Brossman Blair Music Center

This session focuses on finding a common ground—recognizing the differences, biases, and identities we all hold, and learning how to move about cohesively with each other. We will explore the topics of marginalization, privilege, racism, and oppression based on race, gender, ethnicity, religion, and more. This is an engaging session that is energetic and based on audience participation. Please feel free to volunteer to share, speak, and participate when you feel inclined. We will end with Theatre of Oppression, which will help explore the themes that are linked throughout the workshop.

Facilitated by Faith Tiemann, director, Multicultural Student Initiatives, SUNY Oneonta

Intergroup Dialogue: Accountability in an Uncivil Society | Room 203, Neidig-Garber Science Center

In recent years, the public discourse on race, gender, sexuality, and other markers of identity have become more and more fraught. Additional public attention is being given to opinions that, until recently, were deemed too shameful for public utterance and relegated to the margins of society. Additionally, divisiveness seems the order of the day and civility has taken a back seat to tribal partisanship of all kinds. In this atmosphere, how do we construct social norms that empower us and live up to our greatest ideals? How do we respect difference while holding on to our values? How do we engage in civil discourse over issues that threaten to divide us? How do we hold others accountable for behavior we deem uncivil? When is it appropriate to call out bad behavior or language? What are the limits of tolerance? We hope to foster a healthy discussion about diversity and to engage tough questions about the difficulties inherent in facing difference and work at better understanding the real rewards available in a diverse community.

Facilitated by Matthew Sayers, associate professor of religion, Holly Wendt, associate professor of English, director of creative writing, Shayani Bhattacharya, assistant professor of English.

Poverty Simulation | Underground, Allan W. Mund College Center

Join volunteers from the LVC community and the Palmyra Circles group who will lead students in an interactive poverty simulation.

1–2 p.m. | Educational Sessions

Inclusion and Diversity Training for Faculty: Moving from Bystander Behavior to Courageous Classroom Conversations | Zimmerman Recital Hall, Suzanne H. Arnold Gallery

This session will explore ways to facilitate meaningful dialogues after critical national and workplace incidences, channel emotionally charged situations and/or frustrations into teaching and learning opportunities, and identify ways to infuse diversity and inclusion into classroom assignments.

Facilitated by Marvin Worthy.

A Partial History of Xenophobia in the United States of America | Room 170, Clyde A. Lynch ’18 Memorial Hall

Part 1 is a 40-minute look at American attitudes toward the Pennsylvania Dutch, Irish, Italians, blacks, Native Americans, Jews, Americans of Japanese ancestry, and Mexicans. There will be time for questions and discussion.

Facilitated by Tim Dewald, adjunct instructor.

Disciple Makers: Understanding Racism Biblically, Historically, and Personally | Room 167, Clyde A. Lynch ’18 Memorial Hall

Racism and injustice are a disturbing reality in our country. Our first step is to learn and understand: What is racism? What does the Bible have to say? What can we learn from history? How has racism affected people personally? And what unique resources does Christianity provide to help address racism?

Sarah Evans and Kaylah Olshefsky come to the topic of racism with different perspectives. As a black woman in America, Kaylah has experienced first-hand the pain of personal and systemic racism. Sarah studied the history of race in America at Gettysburg College. Both are humbly learning what it means to walk in unity and see the power of God to dismantle injustice and bring peace.

Dorothea Lange’s America | Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery

Michael Schroeder, associate professor of history, and Barbara McNulty, director of the Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery, will facilitate a discussion using the exhibition Dorothea Lange’s America as a springboard for dialogue. The Great Depression was the catalyst for a tremendous outburst of creative energy in America’s photographic community. The devastation wreaked upon the country inspired a host of socially conscious photographers to capture the painful stories of the time. This exhibition features the work of Dorothea Lange (1958–1965) and 13 of these artists. Lange’s empathetic images of migrant workers, suffering families, and tortured landscapes seared the faces of the Depression into America’s consciousness.

Facilitated by Michael Schroeder, associate professor of history, and Barbara McNulty, director of the Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery.

The Human Library at LVC | Atrium, Vernon and Doris Bishop Library

The Vernon and Doris Bishop Library, Center for Global Education, Department of Intercultural Affairs & Inclusive Programs, and the Department of Student Affairs have partnered to offer a Human Library as one of the education sessions at the Symposium for Inclusive Excellence. A Human Library is designed to build a positive framework for conversations that can challenge stereotypes and prejudices through dialogue. The Human Library is a place where real people are on loan to readers; a place where difficult questions are expected, appreciated, and answered.

Facilitated by Sarah Greene, director of the Vernon and Doris Bishop Library.

Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs | Room 101, Frederic K. Miller Chapel

In July 2018, Governor Tom Wolf signed an executive order creating the Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs, the first in the United States. Join this session and enter a conversation with Todd Snovel ’06, commission executive director, to learn more. Learn about the Commission’s major initiatives, projects for 2019, and ways that all Pennsylvania residents can become involved in our call for greater equality statewide.

2:15–3:15 p.m. | Educational Sessions

Inclusion and Diversity Training for Administrators and Staff: Moving from Bystander Behavior to Courageous Conversations | Zimmerman Recital Hall, Suzanne H. Arnold Gallery

This session will explore ways to promote a campus climate where respect and appreciation for differences are priorities, create a campus culture where all feel valued and celebrated, and become change agents by modeling behavior that supports an inclusive campus community.

Facilitated by Marvin Worthy

The Human Library at LVC | Bishop Library

The Vernon and Doris Bishop Library, Center for Global Education, Department of Intercultural Affairs & Inclusive Programs, and the Department of Student Affairs have partnered to offer a Human Library as one of the education sessions at the Symposium for Inclusive Excellence. A Human Library is designed to build a positive framework for conversations that can challenge stereotypes and prejudices through dialogue. The Human Library is a place where real people are on loan to readers. A place where difficult questions are expected, appreciated and answered. 

Facilitated by Sarah Greene, director of the Vernon and Doris Bishop Library.

Let’s Talk About the Addiction Stigma | Room 181, Clyde A. Lynch ’18 Memorial Hall

This session will feature a discussion about the stigma of addiction in young adults. There will be time for questions concerning both addiction and recovery.

Facilitated by Caron Treatment Center in PA.

A Partial History of Xenophobia in the United States of America | Room 170, Clyde A. Lynch ’18 Memorial Hall

Part 2 is a 30-minute look at discrimination toward Muslims and concludes with some of the many Muslim contributions to Western culture particularly, but not exclusively, in mathematics and science. There will be time for questions and discussion.

Facilitated by Tim Dewald, adjunct instructor.

Disciple Makers: Understanding Racism Biblically, Historically, and Personally | Room 167, Clyde A. Lynch ’18 Memorial Hall

Racism and injustice are a disturbing reality in our country. Our first step is to learn and understand: What is racism? What does the Bible have to say? What can we learn from history? How has racism affected people personally? And what unique resources does Christianity provide to help address racism?

Sarah Evans and Kaylah Olshefsky come to the topic of racism with different perspectives. As a black woman in America, Kaylah has experienced first-hand the pain of personal and systemic racism. Sarah studied the history of race in America at Gettysburg College. Both are humbly learning what it means to walk in unity and see the power of God to dismantle injustice and bring peace.

 

Dorothea Lange’s America | Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery

Michael Schroeder, associate professor of history, and Barbara McNulty, director of the Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery, will facilitate a discussion using the exhibition Dorothea Lange’s America as a springboard for dialogue. The Great Depression was the catalyst for a tremendous outburst of creative energy in America’s photographic community. The devastation wreaked upon the country inspired a host of socially conscious photographers to capture the painful stories of the time. This exhibition features the work of Dorothea Lange (1958–1965) and 13 of these artists. Lange’s empathetic images of migrant workers, suffering families, and tortured landscapes seared the faces of the Depression into America’s consciousness.

Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs | Room 101, Frederic K. Miller Chapel

In July 2018, Governor Tom Wolf signed an executive order creating the Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs, the first in the United States. Join this session and enter a conversation with Todd Snovel ’06, commission executive director, to learn more. Learn about the Commission’s major initiatives, projects for 2019, and ways that all Pennsylvania residents can become involved in our call for greater equality statewide.