Courses in Philosophy

PHL 110. The Examined Life. Examination of major philosophical issues and the ways major philosophers have dealt with them.   Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 6 (Religion and Philosophy). 3 credits.

PHL 140. Encountering World Philosophies. A study of diverse perspectives on the basic questions of philosophical inquiry: What is the nature of reality? What is the nature of the self? What is the nature of knowledge? By what standards do we evaluate truth claims? This course examines these questions from perspectives outside the classical philosophical approach rooted in the Mediterranean.  Fulfills general education requirement: Intercultural Diversity. 3 credits.

PHL 210. Ethics. An inquiry into the central problems of values applied to human conduct, with an examination of the responses of major ethical theories to those problems.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 6 (Religion and Philosophy). 3 credits.

PHL 229. Culture and Conflict in Modern America. An examination of the social, political, economic and cultural upheaval of the 1960s and 1970s in the historical context.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. American Social Diversity. 3 credits.

PHL 230. Philosophy of Religion. A study of the issues raised for philosophy by contemporary religious thought. The course examines such topics as faith and reason; faith and culture; and interpretations of revelation, symbolism and religious language.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Liberal Studies Area 6 (Religion and Philosophy). 3 credits. [This course is cross-listed with REL 230]

PHL 270. Seminar in the History of Philosophy. This seminar is dedicated to a historical period or movement within the broader history of philosophy. Conducted in a seminar style, this course will introduce students to research and writing within the field of philosophy, as well as broaden students' understanding of the important figures and ideas that have shaped the course of philosophical thinking. Majors are required to take two of these seminars. Seminar topics include: Ancient Philosophy; Medieval Philosophy; The Enlightenment; 19th century Philosophy; Existentialism; The Linguistic Turn.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. 3 credits.

PHL 280. Logic. Logic is the study of valid arguments, arguments whose conclusions follow from their premises. The course teaches the translation of arguments into symbolic logic so that their structure and validity become apparent. It also teaches how to construct proofs of valid arguments and refutations of invalid ones.  3 credits.

PHL 285. Independent Reading Forum. For this course students will, in consultation with a member of the faculty, develop a reading list to explore critical themes, significant theorists, and/or a key thinker or school of thought in religion or philosophy. The work of the course is in part the independent reading of this list and in part participation in a forum of all students enrolled in this course with faculty from the department, focused on sharing what each student learns in their independent readings.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. 1 credit. [This course is cross-listed with REL 285]

PHL 299. Gastro-Philosophy: Reflections on Place, Time, and Identity. This course begins from the simple premise that human life flourishes if thinking informs eating, and eating informs thinking. While this truth might be considered universal, one can also claim that our eating and thinking is radically shaped and transformed by the contingencies of a particular location, time, and culture. This seeming paradox is the starting point for a three-week study-abroad investigation of food and thought on the Italian peninsula. This course will be offered as a study-abroad course only. Students will live and study in Perugia, Italy for a course of study that matches philosophical reflection about eating and taste with hands-on encounters with Italian food, culture, and history.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 6 (Religion and Philosophy). 3 credits.

PHL 301. Key Authors. Intensive studies of individual great philosophers or principal schools. Potential authors include Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, etc.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. 3 credits.

PHL 310. Themes in Philosophy. The course focuses on the issues surrounding one central theme/topic in the study of philosophy as it relates to the other two courses in a Cluster. Topics may include Postmodern Philosophy, Philosophy and Technology, Environmental Ethics, Philosophy of Mind, and so on.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. 3 credits.

PHL 311. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Philosophy. The course focuses on the issues surrounding one central topic in the study of Philosophy. Students will take an interdisciplinary and problem-oriented approach to such topics as Genocide, Postmodern Philosophy and Theology, Madness and Happiness.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. 3 credits.

PHL 401. Senior Presentation. This course requires students to develop a presentation for their peers and faculty in the department integrating revelations garnered during their coursework. The students will prepare and give a formal presentation of their "one big idea" in a TED styled talk to be digitally archived.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 1 credit.

PHL 417. Seminar in Law. This capstone seminar examines the historical and philosophical development of constitutional law in the United States; the seminar emphasizes the dynamic relationship between the law and moral and political philosophy.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. POL 345/PHL 345, DSP 352, DSP 356 or BUS 450. 3 credits. [This course is cross-listed with LAW 499]

PHL 450. Undergrad. Research Symposium. The LVC Undergraduate Research Symposium is a year-long, team-taught reading intensive course that will culminate in a public presentation and subsequent publication of the student's work. The subject may be thematic based (e.g., "Race and Religion") or focused exclusively on a prominent contemporary figure (e.g., Catherine Malabou, Paul Kahn). External expert scholars will be incorporated into the course as guides, resources, and critical respondents through videoconferencing. Students enrolled in the fall semester of the course will be expected to continue with REL 451 / PHL 451 in the spring.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. 3 credits. [This course is cross-listed with REL 450]

PHL 451. Undergrad. Research Symposium. This is a continuation of the year-long, team-taught Undergraduate Research Symposium Course. It is a research and writing intensive course that builds on the reading, discussion and research begun in the fall semester. An external expert scholar will be incorporated into the course as guide, resource, and critical respondent in the public symposium held every spring in conjunction with INQUIRY, LVC's annual celebration of student learning.  This course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Prerequisite: REL/PHL 450 in good standing, or permission of the instructor. 3 credits. [This course is cross-listed with REL 451]