Courses In Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

BCMB 401. Molecular Biology. Gene structure, function and regulation at the molecular level in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Recombinant DNA techniques (genetic engineering) and gene sequencing are covered in detail.  Prerequisite: Three semesters of chemistry and BIO 201 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: BCMB 401L. 3 credits.

BCMB 401L. Molecular Biology Laboratory. Gene structure, function and regulation at the molecular level in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Recombinant DNA techniques (genetic engineering) and gene sequencing are covered in detail.  Prerequisite: Three semesters of chemistry and BIO 201 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: BCMB 401. 1 credit.

BCMB 421. Biochemistry I. The study of the chemistry of the molecules of life. Topics covered include: the applications of pH & buffers, amino acid chemistry, protein structure & function, the thermodynamics of protein folding, protein purification & analysis, ligand binding, enzyme mechanisms and enzyme kinetics.  Prerequisites: CHM 214 and 216. 3 credits.

BCMB 422. Biochemistry II. The continued study of the chemistry of the molecules of life. Topics covered include carbohydrate chemistry & metabolism, coenzyme mechanisms, electron transport & oxidative phosphorylation, lipid chemistry, membranes, lipid metabolism amino acid metabolism and the integrated function of intermediary metabolism & its metabolic control.  Prerequisites: CHM 214 and 216. 3 credits.

BCMB 430. Biochemistry Laboratory. Investigations of the properties and functions of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids.  Prerequisites: CHM 214 and 216. 1 credit.

BCMB 499. Biochemistry Seminar. Readings, discussions, and reports on special topics in biochemistry.  1 credit.

Supporting Courses in Biology

BIO 111. General Biology I. A rigorous study of basic biological principles, designed for science majors. Topics emphasized include basic biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, embryology, histology, and evolution.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Corequisite: BIO 111L. 3 credits.

BIO 112. General Biology II. This course, also rigorous and designed for science majors, covers concepts in animal and plant physiology, botany, and ecology.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Prerequisite: BIO 111/L. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 112L. 3 credits.

BIO 201. Genetics. A study of the principles, mechanisms and concepts of classical, molecular, and population genetics. The laboratory stresses key concepts of genetics utilizing both classical and molecular approaches. Laboratory exercises include analysis of nucleic acids, genetic crosses, and studies of bacteria and plasmids.  Prerequisites: a C- (1.67) average in BIO 111/L and BIO 112/L; one year of chemistry or permission. Corequisite: BIO 201L. 3 credits.

BIO 304. Developmental Biology. An organismal and molecular approach to the study of animal development using typical invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. The laboratory includes the study of slides as well as experiments on fertilization, regeneration and metamorphosis.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Prerequisite: a C- (1.67) average in BIO 111/L and BIO 112/L and BIO 201, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: BIO 304L. 3 credits.

BIO 305. Cell and Tissue Biology. A study of cell ultrastructure and the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues, including the structure and function of membranes and organelles, cell motility and excitability, and vertebrate tissue similarities and specialization in relation to function. Laboratory includes the preparation and staining of sections using selected histochemical and histological procedures as well as a variety of microscopic techniques.  Prerequisite: a C- (1.67) average in BIO 111/L and BIO 112/L. Corequisite: BIO 305L. 3 credits.

BIO 306. Microbiology. A study of the morphology, physiology and biochemistry of representative microorganisms. The laboratory emphasizes basic bacteriological techniques and procedures.  Prerequisite: a C- (1.67) average in BIO 111/L and BIO 112/L; three semesters of chemistry or permission. Corequisite: BIO 306L. 3 credits.

BIO 307. Plant Physiology. A study of the functioning of plants, with emphasis on vascular plants.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Prerequisite: a C- (1.67) average in BIO 111/L and BIO 112/L; three semesters of chemistry or permission. Corequisite: BIO 307L. 3 credits.

BIO 322. Vertebrate Physiology. A study of the principles of vertebrate body function, with emphasis on the mechanisms by which cells and organs perform their functions and the interactions of the various organs in maintaining total body function.  Fulfills general education requirement: Writing Process. Prerequisite: a C- (1.67) average in BIO 111/L and BIO 112/L; one semester of chemistry or permission. Corequisite: BIO 322L. 3 credits.

BIO 323. Introduction to Immunology. An introduction to the anatomical, physiological and biochemical factors underlying the immune response. The course begins with a discussion of non-specific immunity, cellular immunity and antibody-mediated immune responses. The course then moves into a study of contemporary immunological topics which are discussed with respect to major research papers in each area. Topics include autoimmunity, histocompatibility, immunogenetics and acquired immune deficiencies.  Prerequisites: a C- (1.67) average in BIO 111/L and BIO 112/L; BIO 201; CHM 111, 113 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: BIO 323L. 3 credits.

Supporting Courses in Chemistry

CHM 111. Principles of Chemistry I. An introduction to chemistry for the science major. First semester topics include atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions, calculations involving chemical concentrations, gas laws and bonding.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Prerequisite: one year of high school chemistry or permission. Corequisite: CHM 113 or CHM 115. 3 credits.

CHM 112. Principles of Chemistry II. A continuation of first semester. Topics include kinetics, acids and bases, equilibrium, oxidation- reduction chemistry, thermodynamics, electro- chemistry and nuclear chemistry.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Prerequisite: CHM 111. Corequisite: CHM 114 or CHM 116. 3 credits.

CHM 113. Introductory Laboratory I. Laboratory course to accompany 111. Experiments cover stoichiometry, gas laws, quantitative analysis, equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical synthesis and the use of computers for collecting data. Students are introduced to instrumentation including infrared, UV-visible, and atomic absorption spectrometers.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Co-requisite: CHM 111. 1 credit.

CHM 114. Introductory Laboratory II. Second semester laboratory course to accompany 112. Experiments cover stoichiometry, gas laws, quantitative analysis, equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical synthesis and the use of computers for collecting data. Students are introduced to intrumentation including infrared, UV-visible, and atomic absorption spectrometers.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Corequisite: CHM 112. 1 credit.

CHM 213. Organic Chemistry I. An introduction to the principles of organic chemistry. The focus of the course is on the structure of organic molecules and how the structure of various functional groups affects their reactivity. The concepts of reactivity, structure and mechanism are applied to organic synthesis.  Prerequisite: CHM 112. 3 credits.

CHM 214. Organic Chemistry II. Second semester of an introduction to the principles of organic chemistry. The focus of the course is on the structure of organic molecules and how the structure of various functional groups affects their reactivity. The concepts of reactivity, structure and mechanism are applied to organic synthesis.  Prerequisite: CHM 213. 3 credits.

CHM 215. Organic Laboratory I. An introduction to the practice of classical organic chemistry and modern instrumental organic chemistry. The techniques of organic synthesis are taught along with instrumental methods including infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry.  Prerequisite: CHM 114 or 116. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 213. 1 credit.

CHM 216. Organic Laboratory II. Second semester of an introduction to the practice of classical organic chemistry and modern instrumental organic chemistry. The techniques of organic synthesis are taught along with instrumental methods including infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry.  Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 214. 1 credit.

CHM 305. Analytical Chemistry. Topics for this course include statistical methods; activity and activity coefficients; chemical equilibria involving complex systems; volumetric analyses including acid/base, precipitation, redox, and complexometric titrations; principles of electrochemistry, potentiometry, electrogravimetry, coulometry, and voltametry.  Prerequisites: CHM 112 and MAS 161. 3 credits.

CHM 306. Instrumental Analysis. Basic types of chemical instrumentation and their applications in analytical chemistry are examined. These include gas and liquid chromatography; infrared, UV-VIS, fluorescence, atomic absorption, and plasma emission spectrophotometry; nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry.  Prerequisites: CHM 112 and MAS 161. 3 credits.

CHM 307. Quantitative Analysis Lab. Volumetric, spectrophotometric, and electrochemical methods are applied to the analysis of unknowns.  Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 305. 1 credit.

CHM 308. Instrumental Analysis Lab. Chemical instrumentation is utilized in method development, unknown determinations, and chemical analysis.  Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 306. 1 credit.

CHM 311. Physical Chemistry I. The study of chemical systems from a molecular perspective. Basic concepts of quantum chemistry applied to atomic and molecular structure. Thermodynamic laws and functions applied to mechanical, thermal, and material equilibrium in gases, liquids, and solids. Also included are electrochemical systems, as well as kinetic and transport processes occurring in gases, in solutions, and at solid surfaces.  Prerequisites: CHM 112, MAS 162, and PHY 104 or 112. 3 credits.

Supporting Courses in Mathematics

MAS 161. Calculus I. A calculus sequence covering functions, limits, differentiation, integration and applications.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 4 (Mathematics). 3 credits.

Supporting Courses in Physics

PHY 103. General College Physics I. An introduction to the fundamental concepts and laws of the various branches of physics, including mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and atomic and nuclear structure, with laboratory work in each area.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Corequisite: PHY 103L. 3 credits.

PHY 104. General College Physics II. A continuation of PHY 103. Fundamental concepts and laws of the various branches of physics, including mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and atomic and nuclear structure, with laboratory work in each area.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Prerequisite: PHY 103 or equivalent. Corequisite: PHY 104L. 3 credits.

PHY 111. Principles of Physics I. An introductory course in classical physics, designed for students who desire a rigorous mathematical approach to college physics. Calculus is used throughout. The first semester is devoted to mechanics and heat with laboratory work in each area.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Prerequisite or corequisite: MAS 111 or 161. Corequisite: PHY 111L. 3 credits.

PHY 112. Principles of Physics II. Second semester of Principles of Physics. An introductory course in classical physics, designed for students who desire a rigorous mathematical approach to college physics. Calculus is used throughout. The second semester is devoted to electricity, magnetism and optics with laboratory work in each area.  Fulfills general education requirement: Liberal Studies Area 3 (Natural Science). Prerequisite: PHY 111/L and MAS 111 or 161. Corequisite: PHY 112L. 3 credits.