Check out the variety of educational sessions available to further your knowledge and encourage dialogue around Inclusive Excellence. Choose two educational sessions, one from 1–2 p.m. and 2:15–3:15 p.m. OR one interactive game, simulation, or intergroup dialogue from 1–3:30 p.m.

Interactive Game, Simulation, or Intergroup Dialogues

1–3:30 p.m. | Bafa Bafa | CHA 106/115/116

What role does culture play in your interactions on a daily basis? In this interactive “BaFa BaFa” game, participants will come face-to-face with those of a different culture and will experience the feelings that build when cultural values are not congruent. This simulation challenges stereotypes and empowers participants to leave the simulation with a better understanding of the value of diversity and the insight necessary to communicate and work with those who are different from themselves. Facilitated by Theresa Rosenberg and Caitlin Murphy

1–3:30 p.m. | Poverty Simulation | Underground

Join volunteers from the LVC community as well as the Palmyra Circles group who will lead students in an interactive poverty simulation. This session in facilitated by Lebanon Circles

1-3:30 p.m. | Intergroup Dialogue # 1 | NG 203

Understanding sexuality and gender means more than labeling someone gay or straight, masculine or feminine. This intergroup dialogue will allow participants to further explore the concepts of sexuality and gender, as well as how sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression affect individuals’ realities and lived experiences. Facilitated by Cathy Romagnolo and Holly Wendt

1-3:30 p.m. | Intergroup Dialogue # 2 | Chapel 101

Intersectionality is the intersecting systems of privilege and oppression but one important thing is to remember that all oppression is connected. Intersectionality, essentially, refers to the ways in which socially constructed identities (e.g. race, gender, class, sexual orientation, and ability, among others) intersect to affect an individuals’ realities and lived experiences, thereby shaping their perspectives, worldview, and relationships with others.  This intergroup dialogue will continue to expose and challenge these multiple identities to help clarify the ways in which a person can simultaneously experience privilege and oppression. Facilitated by Abdelis Vega, Michael Davis, and Olajiwom McCadney.

1–2 p.m. | Education Sessions

Acknowledging Invisible Disabilities | LYN 001

This session will allow individuals to develop understanding and acceptance of individuals with disabilities, particularly disabilities that are classified as “invisible”. The session will discuss individuals with disabilities who have proven to be successful, independent members of society and how to support those individuals who simply need an extra hand to help them accomplish certain tasks. This session will address the difference between tolerance and acceptance/inclusion. Facilitated by Marleigh Palmer and Chelsea Bear

Allies in Action: Building a Toolkit for Successful Advocacy | LYN 008

Join the WSGRC Volunteers to discuss what it means to be an ally—an ally for everyone. Through dialogue, activities, and education, this session will equip those who attend with a “toolkit” of knowledge and practices for addressing privilege, oppression, and a way to call people “in,” anywhere and at any time. Facilitated by Women's Services and Gender Resource Center

An Ongoing History of Blackflace | LYN 185

The roles of blackface performance in American popular theater, their impact on racial formation, and their presence in American culture today. Facilitated by Renee Norris

Consciousness-raising and Intersectionality: Equality, Freedom, and Power | LYN 170

Consciousness-raising is a practice that can help in creating fairness in our interconnected world. This term also includes thinking about intersectionality –that is, the ways in which race, class, religion, sexuality, and ethnicity intersect with gender to add to inequality. Becoming aware of one’s privileged position and then using that awareness in positive ways is another part of consciousness-raising. I would like to propose this topic to discuss, question and examine issues of power, race, class, and gender from an integrated set of perspectives that allows us a better understanding of our human experience. Facilitated by Carmen Garcia-Armero

Decolonizing Academic Spaces: What this Means for Women of Color in Academia | LYN 187

Women, particularly women of color face challenges in academia that are so often overlooked or misunderstood. We will listen to the stories of a few women of color as they make their way through the academic system. Together we will reflect on their perspectives and discuss ways that we may all become better allies to them and others here at LVC. Faciliated by Eva Goedhart

Dialogue in Times of Fake News, Media Bias, Polarization | HUM 304

In recent months and years, our society has often been described as very polarized and lacking dialog across political, social, and racial divides. News outlets and other media institutions are often accused of increasing polarization through biased or incorrect reporting. Colleges and universities are sometimes accused of suppressing some opinions (especially conservative voices). In surveys, many Americans state that they find it difficult to identify reliable sources distinguish facts from opinion or fake news. However, a democratic society needs informed citizens and dialog to function. The session examines the role of media in polarization of our society (trying to determine how big the role of media really is), what we can do to identify reliable information, and how we can engage in dialog with those who have opinions very different from ours. Facilitated by Joerg Meindl

Europe and Refugees: Causes, Realities, and Consequences | HUM 209

Wars, ethnic conflict, economic crises, and climate change have made the homes of many Middle Easterners and Africans into unlivable places.  Many men, women, and children have made a harrowing journey to Europe in search of a stable, peaceful place to live, work, and attend school.  Europeans, however, have been ambivalent at best, hostile at worst, in their attitudes toward the increased number of refugees in their midst.  This session will explore the reasons why so many have left their homes, the welcome (or lack thereof) they are receiving in Europe, and some of the societal shifts European countries are experiencing with the arrival of these newcomers.  We will also briefly compare US and European responses to this refugee crisis, and discuss the implications for the United States, and why we as Americans should take an interest. Facilitated by Rick Chamberlin

Free Speech is NOT Black and White | LYN 186

We will explore our Constitutional right of free speech. In honor of that right, we will explore it in an open, guided forum that looks at the need to protect speech that makes us uncomfortable. We will also explore how speech occurs without words. Let's remember...the Founding Fathers granted us Free Speech, not freedom from consequences. Facilitated by Andrew Hildebrand

Health Care Disparities in Collegiate Sports | HUM 302

This session will focus Healthcare Disparities in Collegiate Sports.  Topics will include but are not limited to sex and racial differences in mortality, lack of diversity among healthcare providers, and sexual discrimination in collegiate sports.  In addition, the lack of data describing representation and support for the LGBTQ community in sports healthcare and among student-athletes will be discussed. Facilitated by Thomas Dompier

Is this the end of Sexual Harassment in the Workplace?: A Panel Discussion around the #MeToo & #TimesUp Campaigns | Leedy Theatre

Join a panel of professionals and moderator Dr. Stevie Falk as we discuss one of the top stories of 2017: the #MeToo and #TimesUp campaigns and its impact on sexual harassment in the workplace.  To prepare students upon graduation to create a more inclusive culture and workplace, we will discuss the recent social media campaigns, how to spot sexual harassment, and what to do about it.  A seldom discussed topic in the classroom, students need to know how to recognize and respond to sexual harassment in order to create a more inclusive future. Facilitated by Dr. Stevie Falk

Keynote Debrief and Hot Topics | Lutz Hall

Facilitated by Dr. Calvin D. Sun

No Offense, But... | LYN 167

Typically, this sentence is followed by a statement that is indeed offensive. One setting you should never hear this phrase is the workplace, where on average, people spend 40-60 hours per week. Clearly, the workplace should be an inclusive and safe environment. Managing diversity and inclusion in the workplace is often an unmapped territory. No one says that diversity and inclusion work is easy, and perfection is not the goal; the key is starting the conversation. In this session, you will examine various statements and determine their level of inclusivity. You will have the opportunity to engage in discussion, generate ideas, and examine gendered language all in the hopes of “starting the conversation” and working on making your company the kind of workplace that you are proud of. Facilitated by Sarah Bartz and Brynn Mason

Populist Nationalism & Exclusionary Discourses in the Age of Trump | CHA 117

In this session, profs. Robbins and Schroeder will moderate a discussion on populist nationalisms and related exclusionary discourses in the early 21st century, of which Trumpism is only the most recent and prominent expression.  Ironically, as the forces of globalization and neoliberalism have worked to break down and erode the salience of national borders, xenophobic and exclusionary political projects, magnified by the digital revolution and a radically democratized media ecology, have seen growing resonance among substantial segments of the populace. Facilitated Mike Schroeder

Prayer in the Square: Faith and Politics | CHA 103

Separation of Church and State is one of the fundamental principles of our democracy and the freedom of religion is one of the core values of our Constitution. Yet, many of the political issues of our day require us to make value judgement on what we find important before we enter the voting booth. How do you stay true to your values when engaging in politics? What place does expression of faith play in political engagement? This session will include a discussion about the history of religion/faith in American political life with a particular emphasis on contemporary issues. Time will also be given for participants to explore together what faith looks like in public life. Facilitated by Dan Lebo

Sacred: Text, Image, Ritual—Beyond Boundaries and Intersections into the Real World | Gallery

Join a discussion using the exhibition Sacred: Text, Image Ritual as a springboard for dialog. Five major religions—Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism—provide the focus of this exhibition exploring sacred art. An array of objects such as gold Jewish Torah finials, ancient Buddhist Gandharan sculpture, a Christian Russian Hodegetria icon, an Islamic 17th century leaf of the Koran, and a 10th-11th century Hindu stele representing Vishnu are some of the items included. This variety of work representing themes of image, text, and ritual provides a lens with which to explore these unique traditions and the ways in which they intersect. Facilitated by Barbara McNulty and Matt Sayers

The Era of Fake News | HUM 204

Many today are challenged in understanding the roles played by state and non-state actors who engage in cyberattacks, misinformation, and covert influence campaigns to undermine and undercut democratic political systems, confuse citizens, and shape public opinion around the world. As the 2016 U.S. presidential election demonstrated, authoritarian governments, extremist groups and terrorists, and opportunists use a combination of tools to influence politics and manipulate attitudes. As digital technologies evolve, so does the threat posed by rivals who co-opt and deploy them against democratic societies. And while the time horizon in the digital world is short and technological advancement is fast, the pace with which American and allied capabilities respond is too slow. Citizens fall victim to manipulated information and other falsehoods. Consequently, conspiracies, hacked emails and false information, not legitimate issues and policies have dominated political discourse and polarized politics. Therefore, empowering people with strong information literacy skills is among the best approaches to combat state and non-state actors seeking to undermine legitimate information and discourse in a democracy, such as ours. Facilitated by Chris Dolan

The First Amendment's Protections and Limitations | LYN 182

Events in the news often turn to debates about the First Amendment and our freedoms of the press, speech, and assembly. However, many people misunderstand the First Amendment and believe that others are violating it when in fact they are not. This workshop will present current events that have sparked conversations about the First Amendment and will compare and contrast the U.S. system with those of other western democracies. Facilitated by Mary Pettice

The Human Library at LVC | Bishop Library

The Vernon and Doris Bishop Library, Center for Global Education, Department of Intercultural Affairs & Inclusive Programs, and the Department of Student Affairs have partnered to offer a Human Library as one of the education sessions at the Symposium for Inclusive Excellence. A Human Library is designed to build a positive framework for conversations that can challenge stereotypes and prejudices through dialogue. The Human Library is a place where real people are on loan to readers. A place where difficult questions are expected, appreciated and answered. Facilitated by Sarah Greene

Transcending Gender | LYN 010

Join an in-depth discussion and widen your ideas around gender identity and expression during this interview of LVC student, Trevor Dugan. Facilitated by Dale Summers and Trevor Dugan

2:15–3:15 p.m. | Education Sessions

Acknowledging Invisible Disabilities | LYN 001

This session will allow individuals to develop understanding and acceptance of individuals with disabilities, particularly disabilities that are classified as “invisible”. The session will discuss individuals with disabilities who have proven to be successful, independent members of society and how to support those individuals who simply need an extra hand to help them accomplish certain tasks. This session will address the difference between tolerance and acceptance/inclusion. Facilitated by Marleigh Palmer and Chelsea Bear

An Ongoing History of Blackflace | LYN 185

The roles of blackface performance in American popular theater, their impact on racial formation, and their presence in American culture today. Facilitated by Renee Norris

Changing Faces of Government | HUM 210

This session talks about the government structure and touch on how within the current political climate there are many changes which include the Me Too movement, more females elected to office than ever before, more diversity in terms of those that are being elected, and really how this is fundamentally changing the government and will continue to do so. Facilitated by Geoffrey Roche

Consciousness-raising and Intersectionality: Equality, Freedom, and Power | LYN 170

Consciousness-raising is a practice that can help in creating fairness in our interconnected world. This term also includes thinking about intersectionality –that is, the ways in which race, class, religion, sexuality, and ethnicity intersect with gender to add to inequality. Becoming aware of one’s privileged position and then using that awareness in positive ways is another part of consciousness-raising. I would like to propose this topic to discuss, question and examine issues of power, race, class, and gender from an integrated set of perspectives that allows us a better understanding of our human experience. Facilitated by Carmen Garcia-Armero

Dialogue in Times of Fake News, Media Bias, Polarization | HUM 304

In recent months and years, our society has often been described as very polarized and lacking dialog across political, social, and racial divides. News outlets and other media institutions are often accused of increasing polarization through biased or incorrect reporting. Colleges and universities are sometimes accused of suppressing some opinions (especially conservative voices). In surveys, many Americans state that they find it difficult to identify reliable sources distinguish facts from opinion or fake news. However, a democratic society needs informed citizens and dialog to function. The session examines the role of media in polarization of our society (trying to determine how big the role of media really is), what we can do to identify reliable information, and how we can engage in dialog with those who have opinions very different from ours. Facilitated by Joerg Meindl

Europe and Refugees: Causes, Realities, and Consequences | HUM 209

Wars, ethnic conflict, economic crises, and climate change have made the homes of many Middle Easterners and Africans into unlivable places.  Many men, women, and children have made a harrowing journey to Europe in search of a stable, peaceful place to live, work, and attend school.  Europeans, however, have been ambivalent at best, hostile at worst, in their attitudes toward the increased number of refugees in their midst.  This session will explore the reasons why so many have left their homes, the welcome (or lack thereof) they are receiving in Europe, and some of the societal shifts European countries are experiencing with the arrival of these newcomers.  We will also briefly compare US and European responses to this refugee crisis, and discuss the implications for the United States, and why we as Americans should take an interest. Facilitated by Rick Chamberlin

Free Speech is NOT Black and White | LYN 186

We will explore our Constitutional right of free speech. In honor of that right, we will explore it in an open, guided forum that looks at the need to protect speech that makes us uncomfortable. We will also explore how speech occurs without words. Let's remember...the Founding Fathers granted us Free Speech, not freedom from consequences. Facilitated by Andrew Hildebrand

Health Care Disparities in Collegiate Sports | HUM 302

This session will focus Healthcare Disparities in Collegiate Sports.  Topics will include but are not limited to sex and racial differences in mortality, lack of diversity among healthcare providers, and sexual discrimination in collegiate sports.  In addition, the lack of data describing representation and support for the LGBTQ community in sports healthcare and among student-athletes will be discussed. Facilitated by Thomas Dompier

Keynote Debrief and Hot Topics | Lutz Hall

Facilitated by Dr. Calvin D. Sun

Let's Talk | LYN 008

As we operate from our various perspective s of privilege, let's have an informal discussion about how to make our spaces (i.e., classrooms, fields, clubs and social settings) more inclusive. Together we can glean information from our colleagues and share some insight from student perspectives and lived experiences. Facilitated by Renata Williams and Faith Tiemann

No Offense, But... | LYN 167

Typically, this sentence is followed by a statement that is indeed offensive. One setting you should never hear this phrase is the workplace, where on average, people spend 40-60 hours per week. Clearly, the workplace should be an inclusive and safe environment. Managing diversity and inclusion in the workplace is often an unmapped territory. No one says that diversity and inclusion work is easy, and perfection is not the goal; the key is starting the conversation. In this session, you will examine various statements and determine their level of inclusivity. You will have the opportunity to engage in discussion, generate ideas, and examine gendered language all in the hopes of “starting the conversation” and working on making your company the kind of workplace that you are proud of. Facilitated by Sarah Bartz and Brynn Mason

Populist Nationalism & Exclusionary Discourses in the Age of Trump | CHA 117

In this session, profs. Robbins and Schroeder will moderate a discussion on populist nationalisms and related exclusionary discourses in the early 21st century, of which Trumpism is only the most recent and prominent expression.  Ironically, as the forces of globalization and neoliberalism have worked to break down and erode the salience of national borders, xenophobic and exclusionary political projects, magnified by the digital revolution and a radically democratized media ecology, have seen growing resonance among substantial segments of the populace. Facilitated by Mike Schroeder

Prayer in the Square: Faith and Politics | CHA 103

Separation of Church and State is one of the fundamental principles of our democracy and the freedom of religion is one of the core values of our Constitution. Yet, many of the political issues of our day require us to make value judgement on what we find important before we enter the voting booth. How do you stay true to your values when engaging in politics? What place does expression of faith play in political engagement? This session will include a discussion about the history of religion/faith in American political life with a particular emphasis on contemporary issues. Time will also be given for participants to explore together what faith looks like in public life. Facilitated by Dan Lebo

Raising the Bar: Immigration | LYN 190

IIn the light of the introduction of the RAISE Act bill in the Congress in 2017, this session will explore some of the issues concerning the current discourse on immigration in the US. Facilitated by Shayani Bhattacharya

Sacred: Text, Image, Ritual—Beyond Boundaries and Intersections into the Real World | Gallery

Join a discussion using the exhibition Sacred: Text, Image Ritual as a springboard for dialog. Five major religions—Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism—provide the focus of this exhibition exploring sacred art. An array of objects such as gold Jewish Torah finials, ancient Buddhist Gandharan sculpture, a Christian Russian Hodegetria icon, an Islamic 17th century leaf of the Koran, and a 10th-11th century Hindu stele representing Vishnu are some of the items included. This variety of work representing themes of image, text, and ritual provides a lens with which to explore these unique traditions and the ways in which they intersect. Facilitated by Barbara McNulty and Matt Sayers

The First Amendment's Protections and Limitations | LYN 182

Events in the news often turn to debates about the First Amendment and our freedoms of the press, speech, and assembly. However, many people misunderstand the First Amendment and believe that others are violating it when in fact they are not. This workshop will present current events that have sparked conversations about the First Amendment and will compare and contrast the U.S. system with those of other western democracies. Facilitated by Mary Pettice

The Human Library at LVC | Bishop Library

The Vernon and Doris Bishop Library, Center for Global Education, Department of Intercultural Affairs & Inclusive Programs, and the Department of Student Affairs have partnered to offer a Human Library as one of the education sessions at the Symposium for Inclusive Excellence. A Human Library is designed to build a positive framework for conversations that can challenge stereotypes and prejudices through dialogue. The Human Library is a place where real people are on loan to readers. A place where difficult questions are expected, appreciated and answered. Facilitated by Sarah Greene

Women in STEM | NG 312

The session will highlight both known and relatively unknown female leaders in all STEM fields. It will also address modern day movements including the Women’s March and the March for Science. Facilitated by Stacy Goodman